Honour School of Literae Humaniores

A

  • 1. The Branches of the Honour School of Literae Humaniores shall be (I) Greek and Roman History, (II) Philosophy, (III) Greek and Latin Literature, (IV) Greek and Roman Archaeology, (V) Philology and Linguistics, (VI) Second Classical Language.

  • 2. Each candidate must offer at least two of Branches (I)-(V).

  • 3. No candidate shall be admitted to the examination in this school unless he or she has either passed or been exempted from the First Public Examination.

  • 4. The examination in this school shall be under the joint supervision of the Boards of the Faculties of Classics and Philosophy, which shall appoint a joint standing committee to make regulations concerning it and review its operation, subject always to the preceding clauses of this subsection.

B

  • 1. Candidates shall take either Course I or Course II. Persons who have satisfied the Moderators in Course IA, IB, or IC of Honour Moderations in Classics or of the Preliminary Examination in Classics may not enter for the Honour School of Literae Humaniores Course II without permission from the Board of the Faculty of Classics after consultation where appropriate with the Board of the Faculty of Philosophy. Such permission, which will be given only for special reasons, must be sought as early as possible, and in no case later than noon on the Friday of the first week of Michaelmas Term before the examination, by writing to the Chair of the Board of the Faculty of Classics, c/o 66 St Giles'. Applications must be accompanied by a letter of support from the applicant's society.

  • 2. Candidates must offer eight subjects (and any associated papers of translation), which may include: up to five subjects in Greek and Roman History; up to five subjects in Philosophy; up to five subjects in Greek and Latin Literature; up to two subjects (or up to three, if one is a thesis [IV.6]) in Greek and Roman Archaeology; up to two subjects (or up to three, if one is a thesis [V. 5]) in Philology and Linguistics; two subjects in Second Classical Language; except that (i) candidates in Course I may not offer Second Classical Language and (ii) candidates in Course II who offer Second Classical Language may not offer more than four subjects in any one of Greek and Roman History, Philosophy, and Greek and Latin Literature. The combinations of subjects permitted are set out in I-VI below. Candidates may offer a thesis as one of their subjects, with the proviso that those offering a thesis in Philosophy must offer at least three other subjects in Philosophy. No candidate may offer more than one thesis, except that a Special Thesis may be offered in addition to one other thesis.

  • 3. All candidates must offer at least four text-based subjects, except that candidates in Course II who offer Second Classical Language must offer at least three text-based subjects. All candidates in Course I must offer at least one text-based subject in each of (1) Greek and (2) Latin. Some subjects (III. 3, III. 4, III. 7) may count as text-based subjects in either Greek or Latin. The text-based subjects are as follows:

    • (1) in Greek

      • I. 1: Greek History 1

      • I. 2: Greek History 2

      • I. 3: Greek History 3

      • I. 4: Roman History 4

      • II. 130: Plato, Republic

      • II. 131: Plato, Theaetetus and Sophist

      • II. 132: Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics

      • II. 133: Aristotle, Physics

      • II. 134: Sextus Empiricus

      • III. 1: Greek Literature of the 5th Century bc , if offered in version (a)

      • III. 3: Historiography

      • III. 4: Lyric Poetry

      • III. 5: Early Greek Hexameter Poetry

      • III. 6: Greek Tragedy

      • III. 7: Comedy

      • III. 8: Hellenistic Poetry

      • III. 13: Euripides, Orestes

      • III.15(b) Byzantine Literature

      • III.15(c) Modern Greek Poetry

      • V. 1: Greek Historical Linguistics

    • (2) in Latin

      • I. 5: Roman History 5

      • I. 6: Roman History 6

      • II. 135: Latin Philosophy

      • III. 2: Latin Literature of the 1st Century bc , if offered in version (a)

      • III. 3: Historiography

      • III. 4: Lyric Poetry

      • III. 7: Comedy

      • III. 9: Cicero

      • III. 10: Ovid

      • III. 11: Latin Didactic

      • III. 12: Neronian Literature

      • III. 14(a): Seneca, Agamemnon

      • III. 14(b): Catullus

      • III. 15(a): The Conversion of Augustine

      • V. 2: Latin Historical Linguistics

  • 4. In the assignment of honours all eight subjects offered by a candidate shall count equally. In assessing a candidate's performance in a subject, the examiners shall have regard to performance in any associated translation papers.

  • 5. In addition to their eight subjects candidates may also offer, but are not required to offer, a Special Thesis in accordance with VII below.

  • 6. Any candidate whose native language is not English may bring a bilingual (native language to English) dictionary for use in any examination paper where candidates are required to translate Ancient Greek and/or Latin texts into English.

I. Greek and Roman History

Familiarity with the epigraphical material and awareness of the geography, topography, and physical and visual environment of the relevant parts of the ancient world during the periods under study are required.

Candidates may offer up to five subjects (or up to four if they are offering Second Classical Language in Course II). If they offer more than one subject, at least one must be taken from A below; if they offer more than three subjects, at least two must be taken from A; if they offer five subjects, at least three must be taken from A. Subjects from A must be taken with the associated translation papers from D below.

A. Greek and Roman History Periods

In Course I all period subjects must be offered as text-based. Course II candidates who are taking period subjects must offer at least one as text-based. Course IIA candidates taking periods I.5 and I.6 must offer them as text-based papers; Course IIB candidates taking periods I.1-I.4 must offer them as text-based papers. Course II candidates may not offer more than one period paper as non-text-based.

  • I.1. The Early Greek World and Herodotus' Histories: 650 to 479 bc

    For those offering this period as a text-based subject, passages for compulsory comment and translation will be set from Herodotus I. 141-77, III. 39-60, V. 28-VI end; Aristotle, Athenaion Politeia i-xxiv.

  • I.2. Thucydides and the Greek World: 479 to 403 bc

    For those offering this period as a text-based subject, passages for compulsory comment and translation will be set from:

    Thucydides, Histories: Book I. 89-II. 54; book III. 20-85; book VIII. 45-98.

    Xenophon, Hellenica: book II. 2-4.

  • I.3. The End of the Peloponnesian War to the Death of Philip II of Macedon: 403 to 336 bc

    For those offering this period as a text-based subject, passages for compulsory comment and translation will be set from:

    Xenophon, Hellenica, Books III and V

    Xenophon, Constitution of the Spartans

    Plutarch, Life of Pelopidas

    Demosthenes, Philippic I, On the Peace, Philippic III.

  • I.4. Polybius, Rome and the Mediterranean: 241-146 bc

    For those offering this period as a text-based subject, passages for compulsory comment and translation will be set from the following sections of Polybius: I. 1-4, 62-65; II. 1-13, 21-4; III. 1-34; V. 101-10; VI. 3-18; VII. 9; XI. 4-6; XVI. 24-35; XVIII. 1-12; 34-52; XXI. 29-32, 41-6; XXIII. 1-5, 9, 17; XXIV. 8-13; XXX. 1-5, 30-1; XXXI. 21-30; XXXVI. 1-6, 9, 17; XXXVIII. 1-18.

  • I.5. Republic in Crisis: 146-46 bc

    For those offering this period as a text-based subject, passages for compulsory comment and translation will be set from:

    Sallust, Histories the following fragments:

    1.55 = 1.48 McG (Speech of Lepidus)

    1.77 = 1.67 McG (Speech of Philippus)

    2.47 = 2.44 McG (Speech of Cotta)

    2.98 = 2.82 McG (Letter of Pompey)

    3.48 = 3.34 McG (Speech of Macer)

    4.69 = 4.67 McG (Letter of Mithridates)

    (first number that in the OCT, second that in the translation and commentary of P.

    McGushin (Oxford 1992 and 1994))

    Cicero, Verrines I, De imperio Cn. Pompei

    Cicero, Letters: Ad fam. I. 2, 9; V. 7; VI. 6; VII. 5; VIII. 1, 4, 8, 13, 14; XIII. 9; XV. 2

    Ad Att. I. 1, 13, 14, 19; II. 16, 18, 19, 24; IV. 1, 3, 5; V. 16; VI. 2; VII. 5, 7, 10, 11; VIII. 3, 11, 12D, 13; IX. 6A, 9, 10, 11A; X. 8; XI. 6; XII. 2 Ad Qu. f. I. 2; II. 3, 4; III. 6.

  • I.6. Rome, Italy and Empire from Caesar to Claudius: 46 bc to ad 54

    For those offering this period as a text-based subject, passages for compulsory comment and translation will be set from:

    Res Gestae Divi Augusti ed. P. A. Brunt and J. M. Moore (1967)

    Suetonius Life of Augustus

    Tacitus Annals I, XI-XII

  • B. Greek and Roman History Topics

  • Note: It cannot be guaranteed that university lectures or classes or college teaching will be available in all subjects in this section in every academic year. Candidates are advised to consult their tutors about the availability of teaching when selecting their subjects.

  • I.7 Athenian Democracy in the Classical Age

    Candidates will be required to study the social, administrative, and constitutional developments in Athens from 462 bc to 321 bc , and will only be required to show such knowledge of external affairs as is necessary for an understanding of Athenian democracy. The following texts are prescribed for study in translation; although compulsory passages for comment will not be set, candidates will be expected to show knowledge of these texts in their answers.

    Aristotle, Constitution of Athens (tr. P. J. Rhodes, Penguin Classics),

    Herodotus III.80-82 (Loeb),

    Thucydides I.31-44, 66-79, 140-5; II.35-65; III.35-50, 82-3; V.43-6; VI.8-29; VIII.47-97 (tr. M. Hammond, OUP: Oxford World’s Classics, 2009),

    Xenophon, Hellenica I.6 and 7; II.3 and 4 (Loeb),

    Memorabilia I.1 and 2; III.6 (Loeb),

    Revenues (Loeb),

    [Xenophon], Constitution of Athens (Loeb),

    Andocides I (Loeb, Attic Minor Orators I),

    Lysias XXII, XXV (Loeb),

    Aeschines II (Loeb),

    Demosthenes VI, XIX, LIX (Loeb),

    Aristophanes, Wasps, Clouds, Ecclesiazusae, Acharnians 1-173, Thesmophoriazusae 295-530 (Penguin Classics),

    Plato, Apology, Gorgias, Protagoras 309-28 (Penguin Classics),

    Aeschylus, Eumenides; Sophocles, Antigone; Euripides, Supplices (The Complete Greek Tragedies, ed. R. Lattimore, D. Grene, Chicago 1958-9),

    C. W. Fornara, Translated Documents of Greece and Rome 1: Archaic Times to the End of the Peloponnesian War (Cambridge, 1983) nos. 15, 68, 75, 97, 100, 103, 106, 114, 119, 120, 128, 134, 140, 147, 155, 160, 166,

    P. Harding, Translated Documents of Greece and Rome 2: From the End of the Peloponnesian War to the Battle of Ipsus (Cambridge, 1985) nos. 3, 5, 9, 45, 47, 54, 55, 56, 66, 78, 82, 101, 108, 111, 121.

    Optional passages for comment will be set from these texts in translation.

    Opportunity will be given to show knowledge of the archaeology of Classical Athens.

  • I.8 Alexander the Great and his Early Successors (336 bc -302 bc )

    The following texts are prescribed for study in translation; although compulsory passages for comment will not be set, candidates will be expected to show knowledge of these texts in their answers.

    Arrian, Anabasis (Loeb, Brunt),

    [Demosthenes] XVII (Loeb),

    Diodorus Siculus, XVI.89, 91-5; XVII.5-7, 16-21, 32, 47-8, 62-3, 69-73, 76-7, 93-5, 100-1, 108-11, 113-15, 117-18; XVIII, the whole; XIX.12-64, 66-8, 77-100, 105; XX.19-21, 27-8, 37, 45-53, 81-99, 100-3, 106-13 (Loeb), Plutarch, Lives of Alexander, Eumenes and Demetrios 1-27 (Loeb), the inscriptions translated in a dossier available on WebLearn and the texts in P. Harding, Translated Documents of Greece and Rome 2: From the End of the Peloponnesian War to the Battle of Ipsus (Cambridge, 1989) Nos. 123, 125, 126, 128, 129, 132, 133, 136, 138.

    Optional passages for comment will be set from these texts in translation and from Arrian, Anabasis VII (Loeb, Brunt) in Greek only.

  • I.9 The Hellenistic World: Societies and Cultures, c.300-100 bc

    Candidates will be required to study the history, culture, and society of the Hellenistic world, based on the detailed and integrated case study of primary evidence—literary, epigraphical, archaeological. A knowledge of political history is expected, but the main focus is on social and cultural history. Close familiarity with the epigraphical material and awareness of the geography, topography, and physical and visual environment of the Hellenistic world are required. The following texts are prescribed for study in translation. Compulsory passages for comment will not be set, but candidates will be expected to show knowledge of these texts in their answers:

    Plutarch, Demetrios, Philopoimen, Agis-Kleomenes ; Polybius, 4-5; 21.18 to end; 22.3-14; 23.1-4; 29-30 all frgs; 31.1-15; Appian, Syriaca, Mithridatica; Theokritos, 2, 14, 15, 17; Callimachus, Hymn to Delos; Herodas, Mimiamboi 1 and 4.

    Special attention will be given to the following cities, sites and monuments:

    Ai Khanum, Alexandria, Athens, Delos, Pella, Pergamon, Priene.

  • I.10 Cicero: Politics and Thought in the Late Republic

    The following texts are prescribed for study in translation; although compulsory passages for comment will not be set, candidates will be expected to show knowledge of these texts in their answers.

    Sallust, Catilina (Loeb),

    Cicero, In Verrem (Actio I) (Loeb),

    De Imperio Cn. Pompei (Loeb),

    Pro Sestio 97-137 (Loeb),

    In M. Antonium Philippica XI (Loeb),

    Pro Murena (Loeb),

    In Catilinam IV (Loeb),

    Epistulae ad Atticum I.1, 2, 13, 14, 16, 17, 19; II.1, 3, 16, 18; IV.1, 3, 5; V.16 and 21; VI.1 and 2; VII.7, 9, 11; VIII.3 and 11; IX. 6A, 10, 11A, 18; X.8 (incl. A and B); XI.6; XII.21 and 40; XIII.19 and 52; XIV.1, 12, 13, 13A and B; XV.1A and 11; XVI.7, 8 and 11 (Loeb),

    Epistulae ad Familiares I.1, 8, 9; II.12; III.6 and 7; IV.4, 5; V.1, 2, 7, 12; VI.6; VII.3, 5, 30; VIII.1, 5, 6, 8, 13, 14, 16; IX.16 and 17; X.24 and 28; XI.3, 20, 27, 28; XII.3 and 5; XIII.1, and 9; XIV.4; XV.1, 4, 5, 6, 16, 19; XVI.12 (Loeb),

    Epistulae ad Quintum fratrem II.3, 15; III.5 and 6 (Loeb),

    Epistulae ad M. Brutum 17, 25 (Loeb),

    Brutus 301-33 (Loeb),

    De Oratore I.137-59, 185-203; II.30-8 (Loeb),

    Orator 113-20, 140-6 (Loeb),

    De Re Publica I.1-18, 58-71 (Loeb),

    De Legibus II.1-33; III. 1-49 (Loeb),

    Tusculanae Disputationes I.1-8 (Loeb),

    De Divinatione II.1-24; 136-50 (Loeb),

    De Natura Deorum I.1-13; III.1-10 (Loeb),

    De Officiis I.1-60; II.1-29, 44-60, 73-89 trans. Griffin and Atkins (Cambridge),

    Cornelius Nepos, Atticus (Loeb).

    Optional passages for comment will be set from these texts in translation, and from In Catilinam I (Loeb) and De Finibus I.1-12 (OCT) in Latin only.

    This subject may not be combined with III.9, Cicero.

  • I.11 Politics, Society and Culture from Nero to Hadrian

    Candidates will be required to study the political, social, economic and cultural history of the Roman empire in the period ad 54-138. The following texts are prescribed for study in translation. Compulsory passages for comment will not be set, but candidates will be expected to show knowledge of these texts in their answers.

    Tacitus, Annals XIII-XVI, Histories, I, IV, Agricola

    Suetonius, Lives of Nero, Vespasian, Domitian

    Josephus, Jewish War II, VII (Loeb)

    Pliny, Letters I-X, Panegyricus

    Dio Chrysostom, Orations 38-51 (Loeb)

    Juvenal, Satires VII, VIII, XI, XIV, XVI

    Historia Augusta, Life of Hadrian

    R. K. Sherk, The Roman Empire: Augustus to Hadrian (Translated Documents of Greece and Rome 6), nos. 61-200

    Attention will be given to relevant archaeological sites and monuments including the following:

    Nero's Domus Aurea, the Colosseum, the Templum Pacis, The Arch of Titus, Domitian's Palace, Trajan's Forum, the Arch of Trajan at Beneventum, Trajan's Column, the Great Trajanic Frieze, Hadrian's Villa at Tivoli.

  • I.12 Religions in the Greek and Roman World (c.31 bc -ad 312)

    Candidates will be required to study the workings of Greek and Roman religions, including relevant aspects of Judaism and Christianity and other elective cults, between around 30 bc and ad 312. They will be encouraged to display an understanding of relevant modern theories of religious practice, and to be familiar with the relevant literary, epigraphic and archaeological evidence contained in the following texts prescribed for study in translation; although compulsory passages for comment will not be set, candidates will be expected to show knowledge of these texts in their answers.

    Ovid, Fasti IV (Loeb),

    Acts of the Apostles (New English Bible),

    Josephus, Against Apion II (Loeb),

    Plutarch, Decline of Oracles (Loeb),

    Lucian, Alexander; Peregrinus (Loeb),

    Aelius Aristides, Oration XLVIII (=Sacred Tales II) (tr. C. A. Behr),

    Pausanias I.1-38 (Loeb),

    Apuleius, Metamorphoses XI (Hanson, Loeb),

    Minucius Felix, Octavius (Loeb, with Tertullian),

    H. A. Musurillo, Acts of the Christian Martyrs (1972) nos. 1, 6, 8, 10,

    Eusebius, Ecclesiastical History VIII-X (Penguin),

    M. Beard, J. A. North & S. R. F. Price, Religions of Rome vol. 2 (Cambridge 1998).

  • I.13 Sexuality and Gender in Greece and Rome

    The following texts are prescribed for study in translation; although compulsory passages for comment will not be set, candidates will be expected to show knowledge of these texts in their answers.

    M. R. Lefkowitz and M. B. Fant, Women's Life in Greece and Rome, 2nd edn. (London, 1992), nos. 1-27, 36-50, 168, 176, 178-9, 181-207, 273-337, 369-440

    Semonides fr. 7 (Greek Iambic Poetry, Loeb)

    Theognis II (lines 1231-1389) (Greek Elegiac Poetry, Loeb)

    Anacreon fr. 358 (Greek Lyric II, Loeb)

    Aeschylus, Agamemnon, Sophocles, Philoctetes, Euripides, Medea (in D. Grene and R. Lattimore eds, The Complete Greek Tragedies in Translation (Chicago, 1957-9)

    Aristophanes, Lysistrata, Thesmophoriazusae, Ecclesiazusae (Penguin)

    Lysias I (Loeb)

    Xenophon, Oeconomicus (ed. and tr. S. Pomeroy, Oxford, 1992)

    Aeschines I Against Timarchus (Loeb)

    Senatusconsultum de Bacchanalibus, in M. Beard, J. North and S. Price, Religions of Rome (Cambridge, 1998) 2, pp. 290-1

    Ovid, Ars Amatoria (Loeb)

    Musonius Rufus (tr. C. E. Lutz, Yale Classical Studies 10 [1947], 39-49, 89-91)

    Pliny, Letters III. 11, 16; IV. 10, 19; V. 16; VI. 33; VII. 19, 24; X. 120

    Juvenal VI

    Soranus, Gynaecology (tr. O. Temkin, Baltimore 1956)

    The Forgotten Desert Mothers: Sayings, Lives, and Stories of Early Christian Women (tr. L. Swan, New York, 2001), lives of Amma Sarah, Syncletica and Theodora, Melania the Elder, Melania the Younger, Macrina the Younger, and Marcella

    Pelagius, Letter to Demetrias in Pelagius: Life and Letters (tr. B. R. Rees, Woodbridge, 1998)

    Jerome, Letters 22, 77, 107, 108, 117, 127, 128 (Loeb)

    Opportunity will also be given to show knowledge of the artistic and archaeological evidence.

  • C.

  • I.14 Thesis in Ancient History

    Any candidate who is not offering a thesis in any other branch of the examination may offer a thesis in Ancient History in accordance with the Regulations on Theses below.

  • D. Translation

    Six papers, each of one-and-a-half hours, will be set. Candidates are required to offer translation from the texts prescribed for all the period subjects which they offer under A as text-based.

II. Philosophy

Candidates may offer up to five subjects in Philosophy, from the list below. Candidates offering one Philosophy subject only may offer any of the subjects listed below except 199. Those offering at least two Philosophy subjects must select at least one subject in ancient philosophy, i.e. one of 115, 116, 130, 131, 132, 133, 134 and 135. Those offering three or more subjects must also select one subject from 101, 102, 103 and 108. Candidates offering subject 199 (Thesis in Philosophy) must offer at least three other subjects in Philosophy. The syllabus for each subject, including thesis regulations, is specified in Regulations for Philosophy in all Honour Schools including Philosophy. In the list below, numbers in parenthesis after a subject's title indicate other subjects with which it may not be combined.

  • 101 Early Modern Philosophy

  • 102 Knowledge and Reality

  • 103 Ethics

  • 104 Philosophy of Mind

  • 106 Philosophy of Science and Social Science (124)

  • 107 Philosophy of Religion

  • 108 The Philosophy of Logic and Language

  • 109 Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Criticism

  • 110 Medieval Philosophy: Aquinas (111)

  • 111 Medieval Philosophy: Duns Scotus, Ockham (110)

  • 112 The Philosophy of Kant

  • 113 Post-Kantian Philosophy

  • 114 Theory of Politics

  • 115 Plato: Republic (in translation) (130)

  • 116 Aristotle: Nicomachean Ethics (in translation) (132)

  • 117 Frege, Russell, and Wittgenstein (118)

  • 118 The Later Philosophy of Wittgenstein (117)

  • 120 Intermediate Philosophy of Physics

  • 122 Philosophy of Mathematics

  • 124 Philosophy of Science (106)

  • 125 Philosophy of Cognitive Science

    127 Philosophical Logic

  • 130 Plato: Republic (in Greek) (115)

  • 131 Plato: Theaetetus and Sophist (in Greek)

  • 132 Aristotle: Nicomachean Ethics (in Greek) (116)

  • 133 Aristotle: Physics (in Greek)

  • 134 Sextus Empiricus: Outlines of Pyrrhonism (in Greek)

  • 135 Latin Philosophy (in Latin)

  • 199 Thesis in Philosophy (I.14, III.12, IV.5, V.5)

III. Greek and Latin Literature

Course I: Candidates may offer up to a maximum of five subjects from 1-16 below. Candidates offering more than three subjects must offer both III.1 and III.2; candidates offering more than one must offer III.1 or III.2, and may offer both. Only one of papers III.3, 4, 7 and 15(d) may be offered.

Course II: Candidates may offer up to a maximum of five subjects from 1-16 below, or four if they take VI, Second Classical Language. Candidates offering more than one subject must offer III.1 or III.2, and may offer both. Only one of papers III.3, 4, 7 and 15(d) may be offered.

One paper will be set on each subject except III.3, 4, 7, 15(d) and 16. Each of subjects III.3, 4, and 7 will be examined by a one-and-a-half hour paper of translation, and an extended essay of up to 6,000 words. Additional translation papers (one-and-a-half hours each) will be set on III.1 and III.2.

In all subjects credit will be given for showing wider knowledge of Greek and Roman culture.

Note: It cannot be guaranteed that university lectures or classes or college teaching will be available in all subjects in every academic year. Candidates are advised to consult their tutors about the availability of teaching when selecting their subjects.

  • III.1 Greek Literature of the 5th Century bc

    (a) One paper of three hours (commentary and essay) with an additional paper (one-and-a-half hours) of translation.

    (b) Those taking VI. Second Classical Language in Greek may if they wish offer only the three-hour commentary and essay paper, and in that case they will be given translations of the passages set for commentary. This version of the subject will not count as text-based.

    For both (a) and (b) the subject is to be studied with special reference to the following texts, from which the passages for translation and comment will be set.

    Pindar, Olympian 1, Pythians 1 and 9

    Sophocles, Ajax

    Euripides, Hippolytus

    Aristophanes, Thesmophoriazusae

    Herodotus I.1-94

  • III.2 Latin Literature of the 1st Century bc

    (a) One paper of three hours (commentary and essay) with an additional paper (one-and-a-half hours) of translation.

    (b) Those taking VI. Second Classical Language in Latin may if they wish offer only the three-hour commentary and essay paper, and in that case they will be given translations of the passages set for commentary. This version of the subject will not count as text-based.

    For both (a) and (b) the subject is to be studied with special reference to the following texts, from which the passages for translation and comment will be set.

    Lucretius I

    Catullus 64 and 68

    Cicero, Pro Archia

    Virgil, Eclogues

    Horace, Odes III

    Propertius IV

  • III.3 Historiography with special reference to the following texts.

    For all candidates, this subject will be examined by a one-and-a-half hour paper of passages for translation taken from the texts in list α, and an extended essay of up to 6,000 words. Essay topics set by the examiners will be released on Monday of Week 6 of Hilary Term immediately preceding the examination and essays should be submitted to the Examination Schools by Monday of Week 10 of the same term (12 noon); at the same time candidates should submit a searchable electronic version to the Academic Administrative Officer of the Faculty of Classics. Every extended essay must be the work of the candidate alone, and he or she must not discuss with any tutor either his or her choice of theme or the method of handling it. This subject may not be combined with III.4, 7 or 15(d).

    One of the following:

    • (i) For Course I candidates:

      • α

        • Herodotus III.1-38, 61-88, 97-119

        • Thucydides III.1-19, 37-48, 69-85, 94-114

        • Claudius Quadrigarius fr. 10b Peter

        • Livy, preface, I.1-16, 39-60, VII.9.6-10

        • Tacitus, Annals XV.23-74

      • β

        • Rest of Herodotus III

        • Rest of Thucydides III

        • Xenophon, Anabasis I-IV

        • Caesar, De Bello Gallico VI-VII

        • Sallust, Bellum Iugurthinum

        • Rest of Livy I

    • (ii) For Course II candidates or single-language Classics & English, Classics & Modern Languages and Classics & Oriental Studies candidates offering Greek:

      • α

        • Herodotus III.1-38, 61-88, 97-119

        • Thucydides III.1-19, 37-48, 69-85, 94-114

        • Xenophon, Anabasis I.7-III.2

      • β

        • Rest of Herodotus III

        • Rest of Thucydides III

        • Rest of Xenophon, Anabasis I-IV

        • Claudius Quadrigarius fr. 10b Peter

        • Caesar, De Bello Gallico VI-VII

        • Sallust, Bellum Iugurthinum

        • Livy preface, I, VII.9.6-10

        • Tacitus, Annals XV.23-74

    • (iii) For Course II candidates or single-language Classics & English, Classics & Modern Languages and Classics & Oriental Studies candidates offering Latin:

      • α

        • Claudius Quadrigarius fr. 10b Peter

        • Caesar, De Bello Gallico VI

        • Livy, preface, I.1-16, 39-60, VII.9.6-10

        • Sallust, Bellum Iugurthinum 1-10, 20-31, 77-101, 107-14

        • Tacitus, Annals XV.23-74

      • β

        • Herodotus III

        • Thucydides III

        • Xenophon, Anabasis I-IV

        • Caesar, De Bello Gallico VII

        • Rest of Sallust, Bellum Iugurthinum

        • Rest of Livy I

  • III.4 Lyric Poetry, with special reference to the following texts.

    For all candidates, this subject will be examined by a one-and-a-half hour paper of passages for translation taken from the texts in list α, and an extended essay of up to 6,000 words. Essay topics set by the examiners will be released on Monday of Week 6 of Hilary Term immediately preceding the examination and essays should be submitted to the Examination Schools by Monday of Week 10 of the same term (12 noon); at the same time candidates should submit a searchable electronic version to the Academic Administrative Officer of the Faculty of Classics. Every extended essay must be the work of the candidate alone, and he or she must not discuss with any tutor either his or her choice of theme or the method of handling it. This subject may not be combined with III.3, 7 or 15(d).

    One of the following:

    • (i) For Course I candidates:

      • α All of (1) to (4) below:

        • (1) G. O. Hutchinson, Greek Lyric Poetry (Oxford): all texts, except Sophocles and Euripides.

        • (2) D. A. Campbell, Greek Lyric Poetry (2nd edition, Bristol), including the appendix: all texts by Archilochus, Semonides, Mimnermus, Solon, Sappho, Alcaeus, Ibycus, Anacreon, Theognis, and Bacchylides. Where texts overlap with Hutchinson’s, the latter’s edition should be used.

        • (3) M. M. Willcock, Pindar: Victory Odes (Cambridge): all seven texts.

        • (4) Catullus 11, 17, 34, 51, 61; Horace, Odes I.

      • β All of (5) to (8) below:

        • (5) M. L. West, Greek Lyric Poetry: a new translation (Oxford): all texts that are not α texts.

        • (6) Pindar: the remainder of the Olympians ; all Pythians; Paeans 2, 4, 6; Partheneion 2.

        • (7) Timotheus 788-91; Callimachus, Iambi 1, 4, 5, 13, and Ektheosis Arsinoes ; Theocritus 29 and 30.

        • (8) Catullus 4, 16, 21-6, 29-30, 38, 40-3, 52-60, 63; Horace, Odes II and IV, Carmen Saeculare, Epodes.

    • (ii) For Course II candidates or single-language candidates in Classics & English, Classics & Modern Languages and Classics & Oriental Studies offering Greek:

      • α (1), (2), (3), and (6) (except Pindar, Pythians and Paeans 4 and 6) from (i) above.

      • β (4), (5), (7), and (8) from (i) above, as well as Pindar, Pythians and Paeans 4 and 6.

    • (iii) For Course II candidates or single-language candidates in Classics & English, Classics & Modern Languages and Classics & Oriental Studies offering Latin:

      • α (4) and (8) from (i) above.

      • β (1), (2), (3), (5), (6) and (7) from (i) above.

  • III.5 Early Greek Hexameter Poetry, with special reference to the following texts. Compulsory passages for translation and comment will be set from those in list α.

    • α

      • Homer, Odyssey I, V. 1-XIII. 92

      • Hesiod, Works and Days (including the bracketed portions)

      • Homeric Hymns 2 (Demeter), 5 (Aphrodite)

    • β

      • Homer, Odyssey II-IV, XIII. 93-XXIV. 548

      • Hesiod, Theogony

      • Fragments of the Epic Cycle (in M. L. West, Greek Epic Fragments (Loeb, 2003), pp. 38-171)

    • Candidates will also be expected to be familiar with the Iliad.

  • III.6 Greek Tragedy, with special reference to the following texts. Compulsory passages for translation and comment will be set from those in list α.

    • α

      • Aeschylus, Agamemnon

      • Sophocles, Oedipus Tyrannus

      • Euripides, Medea

    • β

      • Aeschylus, Choephori, Eumenides

      • Sophocles, Electra, Oedipus Coloneus

      • Euripides, Electra, Helen, Ion

      • Aristophanes, Frogs

  • III.7 Comedy, with special reference to the following texts.

    For all candidates, this subject will be examined by a one-and-a-half hour paper of passages for translation taken from the texts in list α, and an extended essay of up to 6,000 words. Essay topics set by the examiners will be released on Monday of Week 6 of Hilary Term immediately preceding the examination and essays should be submitted to the Examination Schools by Monday of Week 10 of the same term (12 noon); at the same time candidates should submit a searchable electronic version to the Academic Administrative Officer of the Faculty of Classics. Every extended essay must be the work of the candidate alone, and he or she must not discuss with any tutor either his or her choice of theme or the method of handling it. This subject may not be combined with III.3, 4 or 15(d).

    One of the following:

    • (i) For Course I candidates:

      • α

        • Aristophanes, Birds 1-684, 956-1765

        • Menander, Dyskolos

        • Plautus, Pseudolus

        • Terence, Eunuchus

      • β

        • Aristophanes, Birds 685-955, Ekklesiazousai

        • Menander, Aspis, Dis Exapaton, Epitrepontes, Kolax, Misoumenos, Perikeiromene, Samia, Sikyonios

        • Plautus, Bacchides

        • Terence, Adelphoe

    • (ii) For Course II candidates or single-language Classics & English, Classics & Modern Languages and Classics & Oriental Studies candidates offering Greek:

      • α

        • Aristophanes, Birds 1-684, 956-1765, Ekklesiazousai,

        • Menander, Dyskolos, Samia, Epitrepontes 218-581, 853-922, 1062-1131

      • β

        • Aristophanes, Birds 685-955

        • Menander, Aspis, Dis Exapaton, rest of Epitrepontes, Kolax, Misoumenos, Perikeiromene, Sikyonios

        • Plautus, Bacchides, Pseudolus

        • Terence, Adelphoe, Eunuchus

    • (iii) For Course II candidates or single-language Classics & English, Classics & Modern Languages and Classics & Oriental Studies candidates offering Latin:

      • α

        • Plautus, Bacchides, Pseudolus

        • Terence, Eunuchus, Adelphoe

      • β

        • Aristophanes, Birds, Ekklesiazousai

        • Menander, Aspis, Dis Exapaton, Dyskolos, Epitrepontes, Kolax, Misoumenos, Perikeiromene, Samia, Sikyonios

  • III.8 Hellenistic Poetry, with special reference to the following texts. Compulsory passages for translation and comment will be set from those in list α

    • α

      • Theocritus 1, 2, 7, 11, 13, 15, 17, 28

      • Callimachus, Hymns 1, 5, 6; frr. 1, 67-75, 110, 178, 191, 194, 260 Pfeiffer (this last fr. to be read in Callimachus, Hecale (ed. A. S. Hollis) frr. 69-74); epigrams 2, 4, 8, 13, 16, 19, 21, 25, 27, 28, 29, 30, 41, 43, 46, 50 Pf.

      • Posidippus, Epigrams 1-20 Austin-Bastianini

      • Apollonius, Argonautica III. 439-1162

      • Asclepiades 1, 2, 3, 10, 11, 12, 16, 18, 25, 26, 28, 32 Page

    • β

      • Apollonius Argonautica III. 1-438, 1163-IV. 481

      • Theocritus 3

      • Moschus, Europa

      • Herodas, 2, 4, 6

      • Callimachus, Hymn 2

  • III.9 Cicero, with special reference to the following texts. Compulsory passages for translation and comment will be set from those in list α.

    • α

      • Pro S. Roscio Amerino

      • Pro Sulla

      • In Pisonem

      • Pro Milone

      • Pro Marcello

    • β

      • Auctor ad Herennium I; II. 1-12, 47-50; IV. 11-16

      • Verrine V

      • Philippics III and IV

      • De Oratore II. 71-216, 290-349

    • This subject may not be combined with I.10, Cicero: Politics and Thought in the Late Republic.

  • III.10 Ovid, with special reference to the following texts. Compulsory passages for translation and comment will be set from those in list α.

    • α

      • Amores II

      • Metamorphoses I-IV

      • Fasti IV

      • Tristia I

    • β

      • Heroides 18-21

      • Ars Amatoria I

      • Metamorphoses XIII-XV

  • III.11 Latin Didactic, with special reference to the following texts. Compulsory passages for translation and comment will be set from those in list α.

    • α

      • Lucretius III and VI

      • Virgil, Georgics

      • Ovid, Ars Amatoria III

    • β

      • Hesiod, Works and Days

      • Aratus, Phaenomena 1-136, 733-1154

      • Lucretius I

  • III.12 Neronian Literature, with special reference to the following texts. Compulsory passages for translation and comment will be set from those in list α.

    • α

      • Lucan I, VII

      • Seneca, Thyestes

      • Seneca, Epistles 28, 47, 53, 56, 63, 77

      • Seneca, De Brevitate Vitae

      • Seneca, Apocolocyntosis

      • Petronius, Satyrica 1-26.6, 81-90, 114-124.3

      • Persius 1

    • β

      • Seneca, Medea

      • Petronius, Satyrica 79-80, 91-113, 124.4-end

      • Calpurnius Siculus 1, 4, 7

      • Suetonius, Nero

      • Tacitus, Annals XIII-XVI

      • Seneca, Naturales Quaestiones I praefatio, 16, III praefatio, 17-18, IVb.13, VI.1-3, 32

  • III.13 Euripides, Orestes: papyri, manuscripts, text

    The paper will consist of: (i) transcription of short passages from both (a) a papyrus of Greek poetry and (b) a medieval manuscript of the Orestes; (ii) textual and interpretative commentary on a choice of passages (with apparatus criticus), from Euripides, Orestes 1-347 and 1246-1693. Both (i) and (ii) are to be attempted. Candidates will be expected to show appropriate knowledge of the history of transmission and the principles of textual criticism; they will also be expected to show, as appropriate, knowledge of the whole play.

  • III.14 Either

    • (a) Seneca, Agamemnon: manuscripts, text, interpretation

      The paper will consist of (i) a compulsory transcription from a manuscript of a passage of the play and (ii) textual and interpretative commentary on a choice of passages (with apparatus criticus). Candidates will be expected to show appropriate knowledge of the history of transmission and the principles of textual criticism.1

    • or

    • (b) Catullus: manuscripts, text, interpretation

      The paper will consist of (i) a compulsory transcription from a manuscript of Catullus and (ii) textual and interpretative commentary on a choice of passages (with apparatus criticus). Candidates will be expected to show appropriate knowledge of the history of transmission and the principles of textual criticism. Passages for commentary will be drawn from the following portions of the text: 1-14, 27-39, 44-51, 65-7, 69-76, 95-101, 114-116.1

  • III.15 One of the following:

    • (a) The Conversion of Augustine. Compulsory passages for translation and comment will be set from Augustine, Confessions V-IX; Symmachus, Relationes III; Ambrose, Epist. 17-18; Jerome, Epist. 22, 38, 45, 107, 127.

    • (b) Byzantine Literature. Compulsory passages for translation and comment will be set; candidates will be required to take all the passages they offer either from (i) below or from (ii). In their essays, candidates will be expected to show knowledge of both (i) and (ii). Texts will be available in a leaflet from the Classics Office, Classics Centre, 66, St Giles'.

      • (i) [sixth century ad ]. Romanos the Melodist, Kontakia 1, 17, and 54, from Sancti Romani Melodi Cantica: Cantica Genuina, ed. C. A. Trypanis and P. Maas (Oxford, 1963); Procopius, Persian Wars 1.24, 2.22-23, Gothic Wars 4.20, Secret History 6-12, from Opera omnia, ed. J. Haury, rev. P. Wirth (Leipzig, 1962-4); Agathias, Book 1, from Historiarum libri quinque, ed. R. Keydell (Berlin, 1967); Agathias, Epigrams 1-24, 66-75, from G. Viansino, Epigrammi (Milan, 1967).

      • (ii) [twelfth century ad ]. Anna Komnene, Alexias, Book 1, ed. D.-R. Reinsch (Berlin, 2001); Niketas Choniates, Historia, Book 4, ed. J.-L. van Dieten (Berlin, 1975); Digenis Akritis, Grottaferrata version Book 4, from Digenis Akritis, ed. E. M. Jeffreys (Cambridge, 1998); Theodore Prodromos, Poems 3, 4, and 6, from Historische Gedichte, ed. W. Hörandner (Vienna, 1974).

    • (c) Modern Greek Poetry. Candidates will be expected to have read Kavafis, Poiemata, and G. Seferis, Mythistorema, Gymnopaidia, Hemerologio Katastromatos I-III and Kichle. Compulsory passages for translation and comment will be set.

    • (d) The Reception of Classical Literature in Poetry in English since 1900. Authors in English for study will include Auden, H. D., Eliot, Frost, Longley, Lowell, MacNeice, Carson, Harrison, Heaney, Hughes and Walcott. This paper will be examined only by extended essay of up to 6,000 words. Essay topics set by the examiners will be released on Monday of Week 6 of Hilary Term and essays should be submitted by Monday of Week 10 of the same term (12 noon) to the Examination Schools; at the same time candidates should submit a searchable electronic version to the Academic Administrative Officer of the Faculty of Classics. Candidates will be required to use at least three authors in their essays, at least one of which must be a classical author. Every extended essay must be the work of the candidate alone, and he or she must not discuss with any tutor either his or her choice of theme or the method of handling it. This subject may not be combined with III.3, 4, or 7.

  • III.16 Thesis in Literature

    Any candidate may offer a thesis in Greek and Latin Literature in accordance with the Regulation on Theses below. This subject may not be combined with any of I.14, II.199, IV.5 or V.5.

IV. Greek and Roman Archaeology

Course I and Course II: Candidates may offer one or two of the following subjects 1-5, and may, if they wish, offer subject 5 as well. Each of subjects 1-5 will be examined in one paper (3 hours).

They may also offer subject 6 as their sole Archaeology subject.

  • IV.1 The Greeks and the Mediterranean World c.950 bc -500 bc

    Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the material evidence from the Greek world and the areas of contact between Greek and other Mediterranean peoples. Areas of emphasis will include Athens and Attica; the non-Greek states bordering the Mediterranean and their reciprocal relationships with the Greeks; Greek colonial settlements; trade and coinage; problems of method and chronology. Knowledge of the principal series of artefacts of the period, their development and problems of method and chronology will be examined. In the examination candidates will be required to answer one picture question and three others.

  • IV.2 Greek art and archaeology, c.500-300 bc

    Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the architecture, sculpture, and other representational arts of the classical Greek city. Areas of emphasis will include the city of Athens and the historical context and significance of the art and monuments of the period. In the examination candidates will be required to answer one picture question and three others, one each from the following sections: (a) architecture, buildings, and urbanism, (b) statues, reliefs, temple sculptures, (c) painting, painted pottery, and other figured artefacts. Credit will be given for knowledge of relevant material in the Ashmolean Museum and Cast Gallery.

  • IV.3 Hellenistic Art and Archaeology, 330 – 30 BC

    The paper studies major themes, contexts, and media of Hellenistic art, set against the archaeology of the best-preserved cities and sites of the period – from Macedonia to Bactria, from the Aegean to central Italy. The material includes distinctive categories of object, such as bronzeware, clay seals, gems, glassware, grave stelai, jewellery, mosaics, silverware, statues in bronze, statues in marble, terracottas, and wall-paintings. The contexts are cities, sanctuaries, tombs, palaces, villas, and houses. The period extends from Alexander’s conquest of Asia to the adoption of Hellenistic art and material technology in Italy and the end of the Ptolemaic dynasty in Alexandria.

  • IV.4 Art under the Roman Empire AD 14-337

    The art and visual culture of the Roman empire is studied in its physical, social, and historical contexts. Candidates will be expected to be familiar with major monuments in Rome and Italy and other leading centres of the empire (such as Aphrodisias, Athens, Ephesus, and Lepcis Magna) and with the main strands and contexts of representation in the eastern and western provinces. They will be expected to show knowledge of written evidence where relevant as well as of the main media and categories of surviving images—statues, portrait busts, historical reliefs, funerary monuments, cameos, wallpaintings, mosaics, silverware, and coins. In the examination candidates will be required to answer one picture question and three others.

  • IV.5 Roman Archaeology: Cities and Settlement under the Empire

    The subject comprises the study of the Roman city from Augustus to the Tetrarchy placed in the broader context of patterns of rural settlement, agricultural production, transport, and trade. Areas of emphasis include selected key sites (Ostia, Pompeii, Corinth, Caesarea Maritima, Palmyra, Lepcis Magna, and Silchester) and major landscape studies in Italy, Greece, and North Africa. Particular attention is paid to problems and biases in assessing the character of the surviving evidence and in testing theoretical models against physical data. Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of written evidence where relevant as well as of the main categories of surviving ancient material evidence. In the examination candidates will be required to answer one picture question and three others.

  • IV.6 Thesis in Greek and Roman Archaeology

    Any candidate may offer a thesis in Greek or Roman Archaeology in accordance with the Regulation on Theses below. This subject may not be combined with any of I.14, II.199, III.16, or V.5.

V. Philology and Linguistics

Course I and Course II : Candidates may offer one or two of the following subjects 1-4, and may if they wish offer subject 5 as well. They may also offer subject 5 as their sole Philology and Linguistics subject. Each of subjects 1-4 will be examined in one paper (3 hours).

  • V.1 Greek Historical Linguistics

    The paper will consist of two sections: (a) the dialects of Greek poetry; Greek dialect inscriptions; Linear B; (b) the history of the Greek language with special reference to the development of the literary languages. Candidates must answer questions from both sections. In (a) compulsory passages will be set for translation and linguistic commentary. All candidates must answer from two of the three parts of (a).

  • V.2 Latin Historical Linguistics

    The paper will consist of two sections: (a) Oscan and Umbrian; Archaic Latin; the language of Plautus; Imperial and Late Latin; (b) the history of the Latin language with special reference to the development of the literary language. Candidates must answer questions from both sections. In (a) compulsory passages will be set for translation and linguistic commentary. All candidates must answer from two of the four parts of (a).

  • V.3 General Linguistics and Comparative Philology

    This paper will be divided into three sections: (a) General Linguistics; (b) synchronic/descriptive analysis of either the Greek language or the Latin language; (c) the reconstruction of Indo-European. Candidates must answer questions from two sections.

  • V.4 Comparative Philology: Indo-European, Greek and Latin

    The paper will consist of two sections: (a) the methods and aims of historical and comparative linguistics, the reconstruction of the Indo-European protolanguage and its development into Latin and Greek (the questions set will require specific competence in one of the two classical languages, but not necessarily both); (b) linguistic commentary on passages of Greek or Latin. Candidates must answer questions from both sections.

    This subject may not be offered by any candidate who offered the Special Subject Historical Linguistics and Comparative Philology in Honour Moderations in Classics or in the Preliminary Examination in Classics.

  • V.5 Thesis in Philology and Linguistics

    Any candidate may offer a thesis in Philology and Linguistics in accordance with the Regulation on Theses below. This subject may not be combined with any of I.14, II.199, III.16, or IV.6.

VI. Second Classical Language

Second Classical Language is available only in Course II. Candidates offering Second Classical Language who satisfied the Moderators in Course IIA of Honour Moderations in Classics or of Preliminary Examination in Classics must offer VI.1(a) and VI.2(a). Candidates offering Second Classical Language who satisfied the Moderators in Course IIB of Honour Moderations in Classics or of Preliminary Examination in Classics must offer VI.1(b) and VI.2(b). Each subject will be examined in one three-hour paper. In each paper candidates will be required (i) to translate and comment on two passages, one from each of the prescribed texts in the language they offer, and (ii) to translate into English one unseen passage from the language they offer.

  • VI.1 Verse

    • Either (a) Homer, Iliad XXIV

      Euripides, Bacchae.

    • or (b) Virgil, Aeneid VI

      Ovid, Metamorphoses VIII.

  • VI.2 Prose

    • Either (a) Plato, Symposium 189c-end

      Herodotus I.1-94.

    • or (b) Cicero, In Catilinam I, Pro Archia

      Seneca, Epistles 28, 47, 53, 56, 57, 63, 77, 108, 114, 122.

VII. Special Theses

Candidates may offer, but are not required to offer, a Special Thesis in addition to the eight subjects required above, in accordance with the Regulations on Theses below.

Regulation on Theses

  • 1. This regulation governs theses in Ancient History (subject I.14), Literature (III.12), Archaeology (IV.6), Philology and Linguistics (V.5) and Special Thesis (VII), with the exception of Special Theses on subjects relating to Philosophy. For theses in Philosophy (II.199) and Special Theses (VII) on Philosophy subjects, see Regulations for Philosophy in all Honour Schools including Philosophy.

  • 2. The subject of every thesis shall, to the satisfaction of the joint Standing Committee for Mods and Greats, fall within the scope of the Honour School of Literae Humaniores. The subject may but need not overlap any subject or period on which the candidate offers papers. Candidates are warned that they should avoid repetition in examination essays of material used in their theses and that substantial repetition may be penalised. Candidates who offer a Special Thesis and another thesis must avoid all overlap between them.

  • 3. Candidates proposing to offer a thesis must submit to the Academic Administrative Officer of the Faculty of Classics, on a form obtainable from the Classics Office which must be countersigned by their tutor and (if different) by their proposed supervisor, the title of the proposed thesis, together with a synopsis of the subject in about 100 words, not later than the Wednesday of the first week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examination. The joint Standing Committee for Mods and Greats shall decide as soon as possible whether or not to approve the title and shall advise the candidate immediately. No decision shall be deferred beyond the end of the third week of Michaelmas Full Term.

  • 4. Every thesis shall be the candidate's own work. Tutors may, however, assist candidates by discussing with them, for example, the field of study, the sources available, bibliography, and the method of presentation, and may also read and comment on drafts. The amount of assistance a candidate may receive shall not exceed an amount equivalent to the teaching of a normal paper. All quotations from primary or secondary sources, and all reporting or appropriation of material from those sources, must be explicitly acknowledged. Each candidate must sign a certificate to the effect that the thesis is the candidate's own work, and that the candidate has read the Faculty's guidelines on plagiarism. This declaration must be placed in a sealed envelope bearing the candidate's examination number and presented together with the thesis.

  • 5. Theses previously submitted for the Honour School of Literae Humaniores may be resubmitted. No thesis shall be accepted which has already been submitted, wholly or substantially, for another Honour School or degree of this or any other institution, and the certificate shall also state that the thesis has not been so submitted. No thesis shall, however, be ineligible because it has been or is being submitted for any prize of this university.

  • 6. No thesis shall exceed 10,000 words (the limit to include all notes and appendices but not including the bibliography). No person or body shall have authority to permit the limit of 10,000 words to be exceeded, except that, in the case of a commentary on a text and at the discretion of the chair of examiners, any substantial quoting of that text or of any translation of that text need not be included in the word limit. Where appropriate, there shall be a select bibliography and a list of sources.

  • 7. All theses must be typed in double spacing on one side only of A4 paper, with any notes and references at the foot of each page, and must be firmly bound and identified by the candidate's examination number only.

  • 8. Candidates wishing to change the title of their thesis after it has been approved may apply for permission for the change to be granted by the Chair of the Joint Standing Committee for Mods and Greats (if the application is made before the first day of Hilary Full Term preceding the examination) or (if later) the Chair of the Examiners, Honour School of Literae Humaniores.

  • 9. Candidates shall submit two copies of their thesis not later than noon on Friday of the week before the Trinity Full Term of the examination to the Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, addressed to the Chair of the Examiners, Honour School of Literae Humaniores. At the same time they shall submit a searchable electronic version to the Academic Administrative Officer of the Faculty of Classics.

N.B. For prescribed editions in all forms of the Honour School of Literae Humaniores, see the Greats Handbook

1.  University classes will be given for only one of these options each year.