Honour Moderations in Classics

A

The subjects of the examination shall be as prescribed by regulation from time to time by the Board of the Faculty of Classics and the Board of the Faculty of Philosophy.

B

[For students starting before MT 2015: Candidates shall take one of the following courses: IA, IB, IC, IIA, IIB.

Any candidate whose native language is not English may bring a bilingual (native language to English) dictionary for use in any examination paper where candidates are required to translate Ancient Greek and/or Latin texts into English.

COURSE IA

The examination will consist of the following papers.

  • I. Homer, Iliad

    One paper (3 hours) of translation and questions. Compulsory passages for translation and commentary will be set from Iliad I-IX and XVI-XXIV. Candidates will be expected to have knowledge of the whole poem. They will also be required to scan a short passage.

  • II. Virgil, Aeneid

    One paper (3 hours) of translation and questions. Compulsory passages for translation and commentary will be set from Aeneid I-VI and XII. Candidates will be expected to have knowledge of the whole poem. They will also be required to scan a short passage.

  • III, IV. Texts and Contexts

    An essay paper and a translation paper (each 3 hours). Candidates are expected to have considered the general topics as well as the particular texts and archaeological material specified. In the essay paper they will be required to answer a compulsory picture question, and three essay questions. A syllabus of images from which items will be selected for the picture question will be posted on WebLearn under "Texts and Contexts". In the translation paper candidates will be required to translate six passages, three Greek and three Latin, set from the texts listed under α for each topic.

    • 1. The Persian Wars and Cultural Identities

      • α Herodotus 7.1-53, 8.56-110

      • β Aeschylus, Persians

      • Herodotus 1.1-32, 131-40; 3.61-88, 150-160; 7.54-239; 8.1-55

      • Bisitun Inscription of Darius 1-15, 51-76

    • Archaeological material: Identities in Greek and Persian art

    • 2. Dionysus, Drama, and Athens

      • α Euripides, Bacchae 1-1167

      • Aristophanes, Frogs 1-459, 830-1533

      • β Remainder of Bacchae

      • Remainder of Frogs

    • Archaeological material: Theatres, theatre images, and Dionysian iconography

    • 3. Love and Luxury

      • α Cicero, pro Caelio 17–53 (... dedisti.)

      • Catullus 1-16, 31-7, 42-5, 48-51, 53, 69-70, 75-6, 79, 83-6, 95, 99-101, 116

      • Propertius 1.1-3, 6, 11, 14

      • β Remainder of pro Caelio

      • Catullus 64.31-266

      • Remainder of Propertius 1

    • Archaeological material: Love pictures and Vesuvian villas

    • 4. Class

      • α Petronius, Cena Trimalchionis 26.7-36, 47-78

      • Juvenal 3, 5

      • β Remainder of Cena Trimalchionis

      • Juvenal 1, 4, 6, 7, 9

      • Pliny, Epistulae 7.29, 8.6

      • Tacitus, Annals 14.42–5

    • Archaeological material: Houses, tombs, and the archaeology of public entertainment.

  • V. Philosophy Special Subject

    All candidates must offer one Philosophy Special Subject, chosen from either Group A or Group B. Candidates may not combine a subject from Group B with a Classical Special Subject (VI) from Group E. One three-hour paper will be set in each subject.

  • A.

  • 1. Early Greek Philosophy

  • Candidates will be expected to have studied:

    • (a) Heraclitus, Parmenides, Empedocles, and Anaxagoras; and any one of the following:

    • (b) Early Ionian Philosophy;

    • (c) Zeno;

    • (d) Early Atomism.

    A general knowledge of pre-Socratic philosophy will also be expected. The subject shall be studied in Diels, Die Fragmente der Vorsokratiker, sixth or any later edition, edited by Kranz (Berlin, 1951 and later).

    The texts prescribed are:

    • (a) Heraclitus (Diels-Kranz 22), B 1, 2, 10, 12, 17, 18, 21, 26, 28-32, 40, 41, 45, 50-62, 64, 67, 78-80, 88, 90, 93, 94, 101, 101a, 102, 103, 107, 108, 111, 113-15, 117-19, 123-6, and the first part of A 22 (Aristotle Eudemian Ethics 1235a25-7); Parmenides (Diels-Kranz 28), B 1-9, 19; Empedocles (Diels-Kranz 31), B 6, 8, 11-13, 17, 28-30, 35, 112, 115, 117, 134, 146; Anaxagoras (Diels-Kranz 59), B 1-17, 21, 21a;

    • (b)

      • (i) early Ionian philosophy: Anaximander (Diels-Kranz 12) A 9 and B 1; Anaximenes (Diels-Kranz 13) B 2; Aristotle Metaphysics A 3.983a24-984a18, Physics III 4.203a16-18 and 203b3-15; Xenophanes (Diels-Kranz 21), B 1, 7, 10-12, 14-16, 18, 23-9, 32, 34-6, 38; Aristotle Metaphysics A 5.986b10-27;

      • (ii) Zeno: Zeno (Diels-Kranz 29) B 1-4; Plato Parmenides 127a7-128e4; Aristotle Physics VI 2.233a21-31 and 9.239b5-240a18;

      • (iii) early atomists: Leucippus (Diels-Kranz 67) B 2; Democritus (Diels-Kranz 68) B 4, 6-8, 9, 10, 11, 117, 118, 125, 156, 164, 167; Aristotle De Generatione et Corruptione I 8.324b35-325a36, Metaphysics A 4.985b3-22.

  • Where Diels-Kranz B-texts are prescribed, the prescription includes only what Diels-Kranz print in spaced type.

  • A compulsory question will contain passages for translation and comment from (a). A second compulsory question will contain passages for comment (not for translation). At least one passage will be taken from (a), and at least one from each of (b)–(d). Essay questions will also be set which will include questions on (a) and on each of (b)–(d).

  • 2. Plato, Meno and Euthyphro

    The paper will include questions on the philosophical topics discussed in the dialogues. Candidates will be expected to have read Meno in Greek and Euthyphro in English. There will be a compulsory question containing passages for translation and comment from Meno; any passages for comment from Euthyphro will be accompanied by a translation (to be taken from The Last Days of Socrates, tr. Tredennick & Tarrant (Penguin, revised 1993)).

  • B.

  • 1. General Philosophy

    As specified for section I of Introduction to Philosophy in the Preliminary Examination for Philosophy, Politics, and Economics.

  • 2. Moral Philosophy

    As specified for section II of Introduction to Philosophy in the Preliminary Examination for Philosophy, Politics, and Economics.

  • 3. Introduction to Logic

    As specified for section III of Introduction to Philosophy for the Preliminary Examination for Philosophy, Politics, and Economics.

  • VI. Classical Special Subject

    All candidates must offer one Classical Special Subject, chosen from one of the groups C-F. Candidates must not combine a subject from Group E with a Philosophy Special Subject (V) from Group B. One three-hour paper will be set in each subject.

  • C.

  • 1. Thucydides and the West

    The prescribed text is Thucydides VI. Compulsory passages for translation and comment will be set from this book. Candidates will also be expected to be familiar with Thucydides VII and Plutarch, Nicias.

  • 2. Aristophanes' Political Comedy

    The prescribed plays are Knights, Wasps, and Lysistrata. Compulsory passages for translation and for comment will be set from Wasps and from Lysistrata 387-613 and 980-1220. Candidates will also be expected to be familiar with the ‘Old Oligarch’.

  • D.

  • 1. Cicero and Catiline

    The prescribed texts are: Sallust, Catiline; Cicero, In Catilinam I-IV, Pro Sulla; Asconius, In orationem in toga candida. Compulsory passages for translation and comment will be set from these.

  • 2. Tacitus and Tiberius

    The prescribed text is Tacitus, Annals I and III. Compulsory passages for translation and comment will be set from these books. Candidates will also be expected to be familiar with Annals II and IV-VI.

  • E.

  • 1. Homeric Archaeology and Early Greece from 1550 bc to 700 bc

    Evidence on the composition and history of the poems provided by extant archaeological remains, with special emphasis on burial practices, architecture, metals, and the world outside the Aegean. An overall knowledge will be required of the archaeological evidence for the Late Bronze Age and Early Iron Age of the Aegean from 1550 bc to 700 bc . The examination will consist of one picture question and three essay questions.

  • 2. Greek Vases

    The study of the general history of Greek decorated pottery from c. 800 bc to c. 300 bc , including study of the Attic black-figure and red-figure styles and of South Italian Greek vase painting. Knowledge will be required of the techniques used in making Greek pottery and in drawing on vases, and also of the ancient names for vases and the shapes to which they refer. Candidates should in addition study the subjects of the paintings and their treatment by painters as compared with their treatment by writers and should be familiar with actual vases, for example those in the Ashmolean Museum. The examination will consist of one picture question and three essay questions.

  • 3. Greek Sculpture, c. 600-300 bc

    The major monuments of archaic and classical Greek sculpture—their context and purpose as well as their subjects, styles, and techniques. Candidates will be expected to have some knowledge of the external documentary evidence, such as literary and epigraphic texts, on which the framework of the subject depends, and to be acquainted with the major sculptures of the period represented in the Ashmolean Cast Gallery. The examination will consist of one picture question and three essay questions.

  • 4. Roman Architecture

    The subject comprises the study of Roman Architecture from the Republic to the Tetrarchy in Italy and in the provinces, with particular reference to form, materials, technology, and function, and the movement of both materials and ideas. The examination will consist of one picture question and three essay questions.

  • F.

  • 1. Historical Linguistics and Comparative Philology

    The subject includes an introduction to the methods and aims of historical and comparative linguistics, the reconstruction of the Indo-European protolanguage and its development into Latin and Greek. The questions set will require specific competence in one of the two classical languages but not necessarily in both. An opportunity will be given for (optional) commentary on Greek or Latin texts.

  • VII. Unprepared Translation from Greek

    One paper (3 hours).

  • VIII. Unprepared Translation from Latin

    One paper (3 hours).

  • IX. Greek Language

    One paper (3 hours). The paper will be divided into two main sections.

    Candidates are required to offer either (a) or (b):

    • (a) a selection of passages from D. A. Russell., An Anthology of Greek Prose (OUP, 1991), on which questions on accidence, syntax, and style will be set (for the prescribed passages see the Mods Handbook) AND a short passage for translation into Greek prose;

    • (b) a passage for translation into Greek prose.

  • X. Latin Language

    One paper (3 hours). The paper will be divided into two main sections.

    Candidates are required to offer either (a) or (b):

    • (a) a selection of passages from D. A Russell., An Anthology of Latin Prose (OUP, 1990), on which questions on accidence, syntax, and style will be set (for the prescribed passages see the Mods Handbook) AND a short passage for translation into Latin prose;

    • (b) a passage for translation into Latin prose.

  • XI. (Optional Paper) Verse Composition or Additional Translation or Additional Translation and Metre

    This paper (3 hours) will consist of the following:

    • (a) passages for translation into Greek iambics and Latin elegiacs and hexameters, of which candidates will be required to translate one;

    • (b) passages for translation into English from each of the following ten books below, and a question on metre; candidates will be required to attempt either (i) three passages or (ii) two passages and the question on metre.

      • 1. Archilochus 3, 60, 79a, frr. 231 and 196A1 West; Mimnermus 1, 2, 5, 13; Solon 3, 5, 23, 24; Sappho 1, 2, 16, 31, 81b, 94, 96, 130; Alcaeus 38a, 129, 130, 332, 333, 335, 338, 362; Ibycus 286, 287, 288; Anacreon 356, 358, 359, 360, 376, 388, 395, 396, 398, 417; Xenophanes 1, 3; Theognis as in D.A. Campbell, Greek Lyric Poetry; Simonides 542, fr. 22 West1; Scolia 884, 889, 890, 892, 893, 900, 901, 902, 903, 907; Bacchylides fr. 20B; Pindar frr. 1231, 124a1.b1, 1271, 1281 Maehler

      • 2. Sophocles, Antigone

      • 3. Demosthenes 54 [Against Conon], 59 [Against Neaera]

      • 4. Plato, Symposium 172a-178a5, 188e2-223d

      • 5. Plutarch, Antony 1-9, 23-36, 53-87

      • 6. Plautus, Menaechmi

      • 7. Horace, Epistles 1

      • 8. Livy 30

      • 9. Ovid, Metamorphoses 7.661-8.884

      • 10. Apuleius, Cupid and Psyche (Metamorphoses 4.28-6.24)

Candidates will be required to offer either (a) or (b).

COURSE IB

The examination will consist of the following papers.

  • I. Homer, Iliad

    One paper (3 hours) of translation and questions. Compulsory passages for translation and commentary will be set from Iliad I, IX, XXII, XXIV. Candidates will be expected to have knowledge of the whole poem. They will also be required to scan a short passage.

  • II. Virgil, Aeneid [Course IA Paper II]

  • III, IV. Texts and Contexts

    An essay paper and a translation paper (each 3 hours). Candidates are expected to have considered the general topics as well as the particular texts and archaeological material specified. In the essay paper they will be required to answer a compulsory picture question, and three essay questions. A syllabus of images from which items will be selected for the picture question will be posted on WebLearn under "Texts and Contexts". In the translation paper candidates will be required to translate six passages, three Greek and three Latin, set from the texts listed under α for each topic.

    • 1. The Persian Wars and Cultural Identities

      • α Herodotus 8.56-110

      • β Aeschylus, Persians

      • Herodotus 1.1-32, 131-40; 3.61-88, 150-160; 7.1-239; 8.1-55

      • Bisitun Inscription of Darius 1-15, 51-76

    • Archaeological material: Identities in Greek and Persian art

    • 2. Dionysus, Drama, and Athens

      • α Euripides, Bacchae 1-169, 370-518, 643-976

      • Aristophanes, Frogs 1-459, 1004-98, 1378-1481

      • β Remainder of Bacchae

      • Remainder of Frogs

    • Archaeological material: Theatres, theatre images, and Dionysian iconography

    • 3. Love and Luxury

      • α Cicero, pro Caelio 17-53 (...dedisti.)

      • Catullus 1-16, 31-7, 42-5, 48-51, 53, 69-70, 75-6, 79, 83-6, 95, 99-101, 116

      • Propertius 1.1-3, 6, 11, 14

      • β Remainder of pro Caelio

      • Catullus 64.31-266

      • Remainder of Propertius 1

    • Archaeological material: Love pictures and Vesuvian villas

    • 4. Class

      • α Petronius, Cena Trimalchionis 26.7-36, 47-78

      • Juvenal 3, 5

      • β Remainder of Cena Trimalchionis

      • Juvenal 1, 4, 6, 7, 9

      • Pliny, Epistulae 7.29, 8.6

      • Tacitus, Annals 14.42-5

    • Archaeological material: Houses, tombs, and the archaeology of public entertainment.

  • V Philosophy Special Subject

    All candidates must offer one Philosophy Special Subject chosen from either Group A or Group B. Candidates may not combine a subject from Group B with a Classical Special Subject (VI) from Group E. One three-hour paper will be set in each subject.

  • A.

  • 1. Early Greek Philosophy

    Candidates will be expected to have studied:

    • (a) Heraclitus, Parmenides, Empedocles, and Anaxagoras; and any one of the following:

    • (b) Early Ionian Philosophy;

    • (c) Zeno;

    • (d) Early Atomism.

  • A general knowledge of pre-Socratic philosophy will also be expected. The subject shall be studied in (i) Aristotle, Metaphysics A 1–8; (ii) G.S. Kirk, J.E. Raven, and M. Schofield, The Presocratic Philosophers (second edition, Cambridge, 1981); and (iii) a Faculty Supplement (available on WebLearn).

  • The prescribed texts under (ii) and (iii) are as follows:

    • (a) Heraclitus Diels–Kranz B 1, 2, 10, 12, 17, 18, 21, 26, 28–32, 40, 41, 45, 50–62, 64, 67, 78–80, 88, 90, 93, 94, 101, 101a, 102, 103, 107, 108, 111, 113–15, 117–19, 123–6, and the first part of A 22 (Aristotle Eudemian Ethics 1235a25–7); Parmenides Diels–Kranz B 1–9, 19; Empedocles Diels–Kranz B 6, 8, 11–13, 17, 28–30, 35, 112, 115, 117, 134, 146; Anaxagoras Diels–Kranz B 1–17, 21, 21a;

    • (b) Early Ionian philosophy: Anaximander Diels–Kranz A 9 and B 1; Anaximenes Diels–Kranz B 2; Aristotle Metaphysics A 3.983a24–984a18, Physics III 4.203a16–18 and 203b3–15; Xenophanes Diels–Kranz B 1, 7, 10–12, 14–16, 18, 23–9, 32, 34–6, 38; Aristotle Metaphysics A 5.986b10–27;

    • (c) Zeno: Zeno Diels–Kranz B 1–4; Plato Parmenides 127a7-128e4; Aristotle Physics VI 2.233a21–31 and 9.239b5–240a18;

    • (d) Early Atomism: Leucippus Diels–Kranz B 2; Democritus Diels–Kranz B 4, 6–8, 9, 10, 11, 117, 118, 125, 156, 164, 167; Aristotle De Generatione et Corruptione I 8.324b35–325a36, Metaphysics A 4.985b3–22.

  • There will be a compulsory question containing passages for translation and comment from Aristotle, Metaphysics A 1–8. A second compulsory question will contain passages for comment (not for translation). At least one passage will be taken from (a), and at least one from each of (b)–(d); all the passages for this question will be accompanied by a translation (to be taken from Kirk, Raven, and Schofield (eds), and/or the Faculty Supplement). Essay questions will also be set which will include questions on (a) and on each of (b)–(d).

  • 2. Plato, Euthyphro and Meno

    The paper will include questions on the philosophical topics discussed in the dialogues. Candidates will be expected to have read Meno 70a-86d2 in Greek and the rest of Meno and Euthyphro in English. There will be a compulsory question containing passages for translation and comment from Meno; any passages for comment from Euthyphro and the other parts of Meno will be accompanied by a translation (to be taken from Euthyphro in The Last Days of Socrates, tr. Tredennick & Tarrant (Penguin, revised 1993) and Meno, tr. Sharples (Aris & Phillips)).

  • 3. Lucretius, De Rerum Natura IV

    There will be a compulsory question containing passages for translation and comment from the prescribed book.

    The paper will also include questions on the philosophical topics examined in that book, together with some questions of a more general character on Epicurean philosophy as expressed in De Rerum Natura as a whole.

  • B.

  • 1. General Philosophy [Course IA, paper V B(1)]

  • 2. Moral Philosophy [Course IA, paper V B(2)]

  • 3. Introduction to Logic [Course IA, paper V B(3)]

  • VI. Classical Special Subject

    All candidates must offer one Classical Special Subject, chosen from one of the groups C–F. Candidates may not combine a subject from Group E with a Philosophy Special Subject (V) from Group B. One three-hour paper will be set in each subject.

  • C.

  • 1. Thucydides and the West

    The prescribed text is Thucydides VI. Compulsory passages for translation will be set only from chapters 1-61. Compulsory passages for comment will be set from the whole book; passages set from 62-105 will be accompanied by the English translation of M. Hammond (World's Classics, OUP, 2009). Candidates will also be expected to be familiar with Thucydides VII and Plutarch, Nicias.

  • 2. Aristophanes' Political Comedy

    The prescribed plays are Knights, Wasps, and Lysistrata. Compulsory passages for translation will be set from Wasps 1-728 and from Lysistrata 980-1220. Compulsory passages for commentary will be set from Wasps and from Lysistrata 387-613 and 980-1220; those from Wasps 729-1537 and Lysistrata 387-613 will be accompanied by the English translation of A.H. Sommerstein (Aris & Phillips). Candidates will also be expected to be familiar with the ‘Old Oligarch’.

  • D.

  • 1. Cicero and Catiline [Course IA, paper VI D(1)]

  • 2. Tacitus and Tiberius [Course IA, paper VI D(2)]

  • E.

  • 1. Homeric Archaeology and Early Greece from 1550 bc to 700 bc [Course IA, paper VI E(1)]

  • 2. Greek Vases [Course IA, paper VI E(2)]

  • 3. Greek Sculpture [Course IA, paper VI E(3)]

  • 4. Roman Architecture [Course IA, paper VI E(4)]

  • F.

  • 1. Historical Linguistics and Comparative Philology [Course IA, paper VI F(1)]

  • VII. Unprepared Translation from Greek

    One paper (3 hours).

  • VIII. Unprepared Translation from Latin [Course IA, Paper VIII]

  • IX. Greek Language

    One paper (3 hours). The paper will be divided into two main sections.

    Candidates are required to offer either (a) or (b):

    • (a) a selection of passages from D. A Russell, An Anthology of Greek Prose (OUP, 1991), on which questions on accidence, syntax and style will be set (for the prescribed passages see the Mods Handbook) AND a short passage for translation into Greek prose;

    • (b) a passage for translation into Greek prose.

  • X. Latin Language [Course IA, paper X].

  • XI. (Optional Paper) Verse Composition or Additional Translation or A Translation and Metre (Course IA, Paper XI).

COURSE IC

  • The examination will consist of the following papers.

  • I. Homer, Iliad [Course IA, Paper I].

  • II. Virgil, Aeneid

    One paper (3 hours) of translation and questions. Compulsory passages for translation and commentary will be set from Aeneid I, IV and VI. Candidates will be expected to have knowledge of the whole poem. They will also be required to scan a short passage.

  • III, IV. Texts and Contexts

    An essay paper and a translation paper (each 3 hours). Candidates are expected to have considered the general topics as well as the particular texts and archaeological material specified. In the essay paper they will be required to answer a compulsory picture question, and three essay questions. A syllabus of images from which items will be selected for the picture question will be posted on WebLearn under 'Texts and Contexts'. In the translation paper candidates will be required to translate six passages, three Greek and three Latin, set from the texts listed under α for each topic.

    • 1. The Persian Wars and Cultural Identities

      • α Herodotus 7.1-53; 8.56-110

      • β Aeschylus, Persians

      • Herodotus 1.1-32, 131-40; 3.61-88, 150-160; 7.54-239; 8.1-55

      • Bisitun Inscription of Darius 1-15, 51-76

    • Archaeological material: Identities in Greek and Persian art

    • 2. Dionysus, Drama, and Athens

      • α Euripides, Bacchae 1-1167

      • Aristophanes, Frogs 1-459, 830-1533

      • β Remainder of Bacchae

      • Remainder of Frogs

    • Archaeological material: Theatres, theatre images, and Dionysian iconography

    • 3. Love and Luxury

      • α Cicero, pro Caelio 30 (sunt autem)-50

      • Catullus 1-8, 10-13, 31, 34, 36, 44-5, 48-51, 69-70, 76, 79, 85, 95, 101

      • Propertius 1.1, 3, 6, 14

      • β Remainder of pro Caelio

      • Catullus 9, 14-16, 32-3, 35, 37, 42-3, 53, 64.31-266, 75, 83-4, 86, 99-100, 116

      • Remainder of Propertius 1

    • Archaeological material: Love pictures and Vesuvian villas

    • 4. Class

      • α Petronius, Cena Trimalchionis 26.7-36, 64.2-67, 74.6-78

      • Juvenal 3

      • β Remainder of Cena Trimalchionis

      • Juvenal 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9

      • Pliny, Epistulae 7.29, 8.6

      • Tacitus, Annals 14.42-5

    • Archaeological material: Houses, tombs, and the archaeology of public entertainment.

  • V. Philosophy Special Subject

    All candidates must offer one Philosophy Special Subject, chosen from either Group A or Group B. Candidates may not combine a subject from Group B with a Classical Special Subject (VI) from Group E. One three-hour paper will be set in each subject.

  • A.

  • 1. Early Greek Philosophy [Course IA, paper V A(1)]

  • 2. Plato, Meno and Euthyphro [Course IA, paper V A(2)]

  • 3. Lucretius, De Rerum Natura IV [Course IB, paper V A(3)]

  • B.

  • 1. General Philosophy [Course IA, paper V B(1)]

  • 2. Moral Philosophy [Course IA, paper V B(2)]

  • 3. Introduction to Logic [Course IA, paper V B(3)]

  • VI. Classical Special Subject

    All candidates must offer one Classical Special Subject, chosen from one of the groups C-F. Candidates may not combine a subject from Group E with a Philosophy Special Subject (V) from Group B. One three-hour paper will be set in each subject.

  • C.

  • 1. Thucydides and the West [Course IA, paper VI C(1)]

  • 2. Aristophanes' Political Comedy [Course IA, paper VI C(2)]

  • D.

  • 1. Cicero and Catiline [Course IIA, paper V D(1)]

  • 2. Tacitus and Tiberius [Course IIA, paper V D(2)]

  • E.

  • 1. Homeric Archaeology and Early Greece from 1550 bc to 700 bc [Course IA, paper VI E(1)]

  • 2. Greek Vases [Course IA, paper VI E(2)]

  • 3. Greek Sculpture [Course IA, paper VI E(3)]

  • 4. Roman Architecture [Course IA, paper VI E(4)]

  • F.

  • 1. Historical Linguistics and Comparative Philology [Course IA, paper VI F(I)]

  • VII. Unprepared Translation from Greek [Course IA, paper VII]

  • VIII. Unprepared Translation from Latin [Course IIA, paper VI]

  • IX. Greek Language [Course IA, paper IX]

  • X. Latin Language [Course IIA, paper VII]

  • XI. (Optional Paper) Verse Composition or Additional Translation or Additional Translation and Metre [Course IA, paper XI]

COURSE IIA

The examination will consist of the following papers.

  • I. Virgil, Aeneid

    One paper (3 hours) of translation and questions. Compulsory passages for translation and commentary will be set from Aeneid I, II, IV, VI, and XII. Candidates will be expected to have knowledge of the whole poem. They will also be required to scan a short passage.

  • II, III. Texts and Contexts

    An essay paper and a translation paper (each 3 hours). Candidates are expected to have considered the general topics as well as the particular texts and archaeological material specified. In the essay paper they will be required to answer a compulsory picture question, and three essay questions. A syllabus of images from which items will be selected for the picture question will be posted on WebLearn under 'Texts and Contexts'. In the translation paper candidates will be required to translate six passages, set from the Latin texts listed under α for topics 3 and 4.

    • 1. The Persian Wars and Cultural Identities

      • β Aeschylus, Persians

      • Herodotus 1.1-32, 131-40; 3.61-88, 150-160; 7.1-239; 8.1-110

      • Bisitun Inscription of Darius 1-15, 51-76

    • Archaeological material: Identities in Greek and Persian art

    • 2. Dionysus, Drama, and Athens

      • β Euripides, Bacchae

      • Aristophanes, Frogs

    • Archaeological material: Theatres, theatre images, and Dionysian iconography

    • 3. Love and Luxury

      • α Cicero, pro Caelio 30 (sunt autem)-50

      • Catullus 1-8, 10-13, 31, 34, 36, 44-5, 48-51, 69-70, 76, 79, 85, 95, 101

      • Propertius 1.1, 3, 6, 14

      • β Remainder of pro Caelio

      • Catullus 9, 14-16, 32-3, 35, 37, 42-3, 53, 64.31-266, 75, 83-4, 86, 99-100, 116

      • Remainder of Propertius 1

    • Archaeological material: Love pictures and Vesuvian villas

    • 4. Class

      • α Petronius, Cena Trimalchionis 26.7-36, 64.2-67, 74.6-78

      • Juvenal 3

      • β Remainder of Cena Trimalchionis

      • Juvenal 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9

      • Pliny, Epistulae 7.29, 8.6

      • Tacitus, Annals 14.42-5

    • Archaeological material: Houses, tombs, and the archaeology of public entertainment.

  • IV. Philosophy Special Subject

    All candidates must offer one Philosophy Special Subject. One three-hour paper will be set in each subject.

  • 1. Lucretius, De Rerum Natura IV [Course IB paper V A(3)]

  • 2. Early Greek Philosophy

    Candidates will be expected to have studied:

    • (a) Heraclitus, Parmenides, Empedocles, and Anaxagoras; and any one of the following:

    • (b) Early Ionian Philosophy;

    • (c) Zeno;

    • (d) Early Atomism.

  • A general knowledge of pre-Socratic philosophy will also be expected.

  • This subject shall be studied in (i) Aristotle, Metaphysics A 1–8; (ii) G.S. Kirk, J.E. Raven, and M. Schofield, The Presocratic Philosophers (second edition, Cambridge, 1981); and (iii) a Faculty Supplement (available on WebLearn). The prescribed texts under (ii) and (iii) are as follows:

    • (a) Heraclitus Diels–Kranz B 1, 2, 10, 12, 17, 18, 21, 26, 28–32, 40, 41, 45, 50–62, 64, 67, 78–80, 88, 90, 93, 94, 101, 101a, 102, 103, 107, 108, 111, 113–15, 117–19, 123–6, and the first part of A 22 (Aristotle Eudemian Ethics 1235a25–7); Parmenides Diels–Kranz B 1–9, 19; Empedocles Diels–Kranz B 6, 8, 11–13, 17, 28–30, 35, 112, 115, 117, 134, 146; Anaxagoras Diels–Kranz B 1–17, 21, 21a;

    • (b) early Ionian philosophy: Anaximander Diels–Kranz A 9 and B 1; Anaximenes Diels–Kranz B 2; Aristotle Metaphysics A 3.983a24–984a18, Physics III 4.203a16–18 and 203b3–15; Xenophanes Diels–Kranz B 1, 7, 10–12, 14–16, 18, 23–9, 32, 34–6, 38; Aristotle Metaphysics A 5.986b10–27;

  • (2) Zeno: Zeno Diels–Kranz B 1–4; Plato Parmenides 127a7-128e4; Aristotle Physics VI 2.233a21–31 and 9.239b5–240a18;

  • (3) early atomists: Leucippus Diels–Kranz B 2; Democritus Diels–Kranz B 4, 6–8, 9, 10, 11, 117, 118, 125, 156, 164, 167; Aristotle De Generatione et Corruptione I 8.324b35–325a36, Metaphysics A 4.985b3–22.

  • There will be a compulsory question containing passages for comment from Aristotle, Metaphysics A 1–8. The passages will be given in translation (to be taken from J. Barnes (ed.), The Complete Works of Aristotle : The Revised Oxford Translation, Volume II (Princeton NJ, 1984). A second compulsory question will contain passages for comment. At least one passage will be taken from (a), and at least one from each of (b)–(d); all the passages for this question will be given in translation (to be taken from Kirk, Raven, and Schofield (eds), and/or the Faculty Supplement). Essay questions will also be set which will include questions on (a) and on each of (b)–(d).

  • 3. Plato, Euthyphro and Meno

    To be studied in The Last Days of Socrates, tr. Tredennick & Tarrant (Penguin, revised 1993) and Meno, tr. Sharples (Aris & Phillips). The paper will include questions on the philosophical topics discussed in the dialogues. There will be a compulsory question containing passages for comment.

  • 4. General Philosophy [Course IA, paper V B(1)]

  • 5. Moral Philosophy [Course IA, paper V B(2)]

  • 6. Introduction to Logic [Course IA, paper V B(3)]

  • V. Classical Special Subject

    All candidates must offer one Classical Special Subject, chosen from Group D, E, or F. One three-hour paper will be set in each subject.

  • D.

  • 1. Cicero and Catiline

    The prescribed texts, from which compulsory passages for comment will be set, are Sallust, Catiline; Cicero, In Catilinam I-IV, Pro Sulla; Asconius, In orationem in toga candida. Compulsory passages for translation will be set only from Sallust, Catiline and Cicero, In Catilinam IV. Passages for comment from Cicero, In Catilinam I-III and Pro Sulla will be accompanied by the English translation of C. Macdonald (Loeb, 1977) and from Asconius, In orationem in toga candida by the English translation of R.G. Lewis (ed.), Asconius: Commentaries on Speeches by Cicero (Oxford, 2006).

  • 2. Tacitus and Tiberius

    The prescribed text is Tacitus, Annals I and III. Compulsory passages for translation will be set only from Annals I. Compulsory passages for comment will be set from Annals I and III; passages set from Annals III will be accompanied by the English translation of A.J. Woodman, Tacitus Annals, (Indianapolis, Hackett, 2004). Candidates will also be expected to be familiar with Annals II and IV-VI.

  • E.

  • 1. Homeric Archaeology and Early Greece from 1550 bc to 700 bc [Course IA, paper VI E(1)]

  • 2. Greek Vases [Course IA, paper VI E(2)]

  • 3. Greek Sculpture [Course IA, paper VI E(3)]

  • 4. Roman Architecture [Course IA, paper VI E(4)]

  • F.

  • 1. Historical Linguistics and Comparative Philology [Course IA, paper VI F(1)]

  • VI. Unprepared Translation from Latin

    One paper (3 hours).

  • VII. Latin Language

    One paper (3 hours). The paper will be divided into two main sections.

    Candidates are required to offer either (a) or (b):

    • (a) a selection of passages from D. A Russell, An Anthology of Latin Prose (OUP, 1990), on which questions on accidence, syntax and style will be set (for the prescribed passages see the Mods Handbook) AND a short passage for translation into Latin prose;

    • (b) a passage for translation into Latin prose.

  • VIII. (Optional Paper) Verse Composition or Additional Translation or Additional Translation and Metre [Course IA, paper XI]

COURSE IIB

The examination will consist of the following papers.

  • I. Homer, Iliad

    One paper (3 hours) of translation and questions. Compulsory passages for translation and commentary will be set from Iliad I, VI, IX, XXII, XXIV. Candidates will be expected to have knowledge of the whole poem. They will also be required to scan a short passage.

  • II, III. Texts and Contexts

    An essay paper and a translation paper (each 3 hours). Candidates are expected to have considered the general topics as well as the particular texts and archaeological material specified. In the essay paper they will be required to answer a compulsory picture question, and three essay questions. A syllabus of images from which items will be selected for the picture question will be posted on WebLearn under 'Texts and Contexts'. In the translation paper candidates will be required to translate six passages, set from the Greek texts listed under α for topics 1 and 2.

    • 1. The Persian Wars and Cultural Identities

      • α Herodotus 8.56-110

      • β Aeschylus, Persians

      • Herodotus 1.1-32, 131-40; 3.61-88, 150-160; 7.1-239; 8.1-55

      • Bisitun Inscription of Darius 1-15, 51-76

    • Archaeological material: Identities in Greek and Persian art

    • 2. Dionysus, Drama, and Athens

      • α Euripides, Bacchae 1-169, 370-518, 643-976

      • Aristophanes, Frogs 1-459, 1004-98, 1378-1481

      • β Remainder of Bacchae

      • Remainder of Frogs

    • Archaeological material: Theatres, theatre images, and Dionysian iconography

    • 3. Love and Luxury

      • β Cicero, pro Caelio

      • Catullus 1-16, 31-7, 42-5, 48-51, 53, 64.31-266, 69-70, 75-6, 79, 83-6, 95, 99-101, 116

      • Propertius 1

    • Archaeological material: Love pictures and Vesuvian villas

    • 4. Class

      • β Petronius, Cena Trimalchionis

      • Juvenal 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9

      • Pliny, Epistulae 7.29, 8.6

      • Tacitus, Annals 14.42-5

    • Archaeological material: Houses, tombs, and the archaeology of public entertainment.

  • IV. Philosophy Special Subject

    All candidates must offer one Philosophy Special Subject. One three-hour paper will be set in each subject.

  • 1. Early Greek Philosophy [Course IB, Paper V A(1)]

  • 2. Plato, Meno and Euthyphro [Course IB, Paper V A(2)]

  • 3. General Philosophy [Course IA, Paper V B(1)]

  • 4. Moral Philosophy [Course IA, Paper V B(2)]

  • 5. Introduction to Logic [Course IA, Paper V B(3)]

  • V. Classical Special Subject

    All candidates must offer one Classical Special Subject, chosen from Group C, E, or F. One three-hour paper will be set in each subject.

  • C.

  • 1. Thucydides and the West [Course IB, paper VI C(1)]

  • 2. Aristophanes' Political Comedy [Course IB, paper VI C(2)]

  • E.

  • 1. Homeric Archaeology and Early Greece from 1550 bc to 700 bc [Course IA, paper VI E(1)]

  • 2. Greek Vases [Course IA, paper VI E(2)]

  • 3. Greek Sculpture [Course IA, paper VI E(3)]

  • 4. Roman Architecture [Course IA, paper VI E(4)]

  • F.

  • 1. Historical Linguistics and Comparative Philology [Course IA, paper VI F(1)]

  • VI. Unprepared Translation from Greek [Course IB, paper VII]

  • VII. Greek Language

    One paper (3 hours). The paper will be divided into two main sections.

    Candidates are required to offer either (a) or (b):

    • (a) a selection of passages from D. A Russell, An Anthology of Greek Prose (OUP, 1991), on which questions on accidence, syntax and style will be set (for the prescribed passages see the Honour Moderations Handbook) AND a short passage for translation into Greek prose;

    • (b) a passage for translation into Greek prose.

  • VIII. (Optional Paper) Verse Composition or Additional Translation or Additional Translation and Metre [Course IA, paper XI]

N.B. For prescribed editions in all forms of Classics Moderations, see Mods Handbook.]

[For students starting from MT 2015: Candidates shall take one of the following courses: IA, IB, IC, IIA, IIB.

Each paper will be assessed by means of a three-hour written examination. Texts and Contexts will comprise two papers, a three-hour essay paper and a three-hour translation paper.

The papers in General Philosophy, Moral Philosophy, and Introduction to Logic will be examined in accordance with the regulations for sections I, II and III respectively of Introduction to Philosophy in the Preliminary Examination for Philosophy, Politics and Economics.

Detailed syllabuses for all other papers, including prescribed texts and editions where applicable, will be published in the Mods Handbook for the relevant year of examination. This will be published no later than Monday of Week 0 of Michaelmas Term in the academic year preceding that of the examination.

Any candidate whose native language is not English may bring a bilingual (native language to English) dictionary for use in any examination paper where candidates are required to translate Ancient Greek and/or Latin texts into English. [For students starting from MT 2016: and any examination paper involving Greek or Latin prose composition.]

COURSE IA

The examination will consist of the following papers.

I. HOMER, ILIAD

II. VIRGIL, AENEID

III, IV. TEXTS AND CONTEXTS

V. PHILOSOPHY SPECIAL SUBJECT

All candidates must offer one Philosophy Special Subject, chosen from either Group A or Group B. Candidates may not combine a subject from Group B with a Classical Special Subject (VI) from Group E.

A.

1. Early Greek Philosophy

2. Plato, Euthyphro and Meno

B.

1. General Philosophy

2. Moral Philosophy

3. Introduction to Logic

VI. CLASSICAL SPECIAL SUBJECT

All candidates must offer one Classical Special Subject, chosen from one of the groups C-F. Candidates must not combine a subject from Group E with a Philosophy Special Subject (V) from Group B.

C.

1. Thucydides and the West

2. Aristophanes' Political Comedy

D.

1. Cicero and Catiline

2. Tacitus and Tiberius

E.

1. Homeric Archaeology and Early Greece from 1550 BC to 700 BC

2. Greek Vases

3. Greek Sculpture, c. 600-300 BC

4. Roman Architecture

F.

1. Historical Linguistics and Comparative Philology

VII. UNPREPARED TRANSLATION FROM GREEK

VIII. UNPREPARED TRANSLATION FROM LATIN

IX. GREEK LANGUAGE

X. LATIN LANGUAGE

XI. (OPTIONAL PAPER) VERSE COMPOSITION OR ADDITIONAL TRANSLATION OR ADDITIONAL TRANSLATION AND METRE

COURSE IB

The examination will consist of the following papers.

I. HOMER, ILIAD

II. VIRGIL, AENEID

III, IV. TEXTS AND CONTEXTS

V. PHILOSOPHY SPECIAL SUBJECT

All candidates must offer one Philosophy Special Subject chosen from either Group A or Group B. Candidates may not combine a subject from Group B with a Classical Special Subject (VI) from Group E.

A.

1. Early Greek Philosophy

2. Plato, Euthyphro and Meno

3. Lucretius, De Rerum Natura IV

B.

1. General Philosophy

2. Moral Philosophy

3. Introduction to Logic

VI. CLASSICAL SPECIAL SUBJECT

All candidates must offer one Classical Special Subject, chosen from one of the groups C-F. Candidates may not combine a subject from Group E with a Philosophy Special Subject (V) from Group B.

C.

1. Thucydides and the West

2. Aristophanes' Political Comedy

D.

1. Cicero and Catiline

2. Tacitus and Tiberius

E.

1. Homeric Archaeology and Early Greece from 1550 BC to 700 BC

2. Greek Vases

3. Greek Sculpture, c. 600-300 BC

4. Roman Architecture

F.

1. Historical Linguistics and Comparative Philology

VII. UNPREPARED TRANSLATION FROM GREEK

VIII. UNPREPARED TRANSLATION FROM LATIN

IX. GREEK LANGUAGE

X. LATIN LANGUAGE

XI. (OPTIONAL PAPER) VERSE COMPOSITION OR ADDITIONAL TRANSLATION OR ADDITIONAL TRANSLATION AND METRE.

COURSE IC

The examination will consist of the following papers.

I. HOMER, ILIAD

II. VIRGIL, AENEID

III, IV. TEXTS AND CONTEXTS

V. PHILOSOPHY SPECIAL SUBJECT

All candidates must offer one Philosophy Special Subject, chosen from either Group A or Group B. Candidates may not combine a subject from Group B with a Classical Special Subject (VI) from Group E.

A.

1. Early Greek Philosophy

2. Plato, Euthyphro and Meno

3. Lucretius, De Rerum Natura IV

B.

1. General Philosophy

2. Moral Philosophy

3. Introduction to Logic

VI. CLASSICAL SPECIAL SUBJECT

All candidates must offer one Classical Special Subject, chosen from one of the groups C-F. Candidates may not combine a subject from Group E with a Philosophy Special Subject (V) from Group B.

C.

1. Thucydides and the West

2. Aristophanes' Political Comedy

D.

1. Cicero and Catiline

2. Tacitus and Tiberius

E.

1. Homeric Archaeology and Early Greece from 1550 BC to 700 BC

2. Greek Vases

3. Greek Sculpture, c. 600-300 BC

4. Roman Architecture

F.

1. Historical Linguistics and Comparative Philology

VII. UNPREPARED TRANSLATION FROM GREEK

VIII. UNPREPARED TRANSLATION FROM LATIN

IX. GREEK LANGUAGE

X. LATIN LANGUAGE

XI. (OPTIONAL PAPER) VERSE COMPOSITION OR ADDITIONAL TRANSLATION OR ADDITIONAL TRANSLATION AND METRE

COURSE IIA

The examination will consist of the following papers.

I. VIRGIL, AENEID

II, III. TEXTS AND CONTEXTS

IV. PHILOSOPHY SPECIAL SUBJECT

All candidates must offer one Philosophy Special Subject.

1. Lucretius, De Rerum Natura IV

2. Early Greek Philosophy

3. Plato, Euthyphro and Meno

4. General Philosophy

5. Moral Philosophy

6. Introduction to Logic

V. CLASSICAL SPECIAL SUBJECT

All candidates must offer one Classical Special Subject, chosen from Group D, E, or F.

D.

1. Cicero and Catiline

2. Tacitus and Tiberius

E.

1. Homeric Archaeology and Early Greece from 1550 BC to 700 BC

2. Greek Vases

3. Greek Sculpture, c. 600-300 BC

4. Roman Architecture

F.

1. Historical Linguistics and Comparative Philology

VI. UNPREPARED TRANSLATION FROM LATIN

VII. LATIN LANGUAGE

VIII. (OPTIONAL PAPER) VERSE COMPOSITION OR ADDITIONAL TRANSLATION OR ADDITIONAL TRANSLATION AND METRE

COURSE IIB

The examination will consist of the following papers.

I. HOMER, ILIAD

II, III. TEXTS AND CONTEXTS

IV. PHILOSOPHY SPECIAL SUBJECT

All candidates must offer one Philosophy Special Subject.

1. Early Greek Philosophy

2. Plato, Euthyphro and Meno

3. General Philosophy

4. Moral Philosophy

5. Introduction to Logic

V. CLASSICAL SPECIAL SUBJECT

All candidates must offer one Classical Special Subject, chosen from Group C, E, or F.

C.

1. Thucydides and the West

2. Aristophanes' Political Comedy

E.

1. Homeric Archaeology and Early Greece from 1550 BC to 700 BC

2. Greek Vases

3. Greek Sculpture, c. 600-300 BC

4. Roman Architecture

F.

1. Historical Linguistics and Comparative Philology

VI. UNPREPARED TRANSLATION FROM GREEK

VII. GREEK LANGUAGE

VIII. (OPTIONAL PAPER) VERSE COMPOSITION OR ADDITIONAL TRANSLATION OR ADDITIONAL TRANSLATION AND METRE]