Honour School of Classical Archaeology and Ancient History

A

  • 1. The Honour School of Classical Archaeology and Ancient History shall consist of such subjects as the Board of the Faculty of Classics shall prescribe by regulation from time to time.

  • 2. No candidate shall be admitted to the examination in this school without either having passed, or having been exempted from, the First Public Examination.

  • 3. The examination shall be under the supervision of the Board of the Faculty of Classics, which shall appoint a standing committee to consider matters relating to the examination and to the Preliminary Examination in Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.

  • 4. Candidates shall be required to take part in approved fieldwork as an integral part of the course. The fieldwork requirement shall normally have been discharged before the [For students starting before MT 2015: Long Vacation following the second year of the course] [For students starting from MT 2015: beginning of Michaelmas Term in the candidate’s second year].

  • Note: It cannot be guaranteed that university lectures or classes or college teaching will be available in all subjects in every academic year. Candidates are advised to consult their tutors about the availability of teaching when selecting their subjects.

B

  • 1. Each candidate shall offer the following[For students starting before MT 2015: elements]:

  • [For students starting before MT 2015: I-VI Six papers from the following options, of which at least one must be taken from each of A, B and C, and no more than one from F. At least two of the six papers must be archaeological (from B and D), and at least two must be historical (from C and E), unless a language paper is taken, as this can replace one of the archaeological or historical requirements.]

  • [For students starting from MT 2015: I An option from List A

  • II An option from List B

  • III An option from List C

  • IV An option from Lists B, D or F*

  • V An option from Lists C, E or F*

  • VI Any other option from Lists A-E

  • VII A site or museum report

  • *No more than one language option from List F may be taken]

  • [For students starting from MT 2015: Subjects 407-13 and 601-5 below will be examined in accordance with the regulations for the Honour School of Literae Humaniores. For each of these subjects, a detailed specification will be given in the Greats Handbook applicable to the relevant year of examination. Detailed specifications for all other subjects in the Honour School will be given in the CAAH Finals Handbook applicable to the relevant year of examination. Both handbooks will be published by Monday of Week 5 of Hilary Term two years preceding the examination.]

    Any candidate whose native language is not English may bring a bilingual (native language to English) dictionary for use in any examination paper where candidates are required to translate Ancient Greek and/or Latin texts into English.

    • A. Integrated Classes

      • [For students starting before MT 2015: i.  Rome, Italy and the Hellenistic East c. 300-100 BC: archaeology and history

        The course studies the political and cultural interaction and conflict between the Hellenistic East and Roman Italy. Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the material, visual, and written evidence of the period and to show ability in interpreting it in its archaeological and historical contexts. Candidates should be familiar with the relevant archaeology of the following cities and sites: Pella, Alexandria, Pergamon, Ai Khanoum, Athens, Priene, Delos, Praeneste, Pompeii, Rome.

        ii.  Imperial Culture and Society, c. AD 50-150: archaeology and history

        The course studies the complex social history and political culture of Rome and leading cities under the Empire, from the last Julio-Claudians to the Antonines, through the rich and diverse body of written and material evidence that survives from this period – monuments, art, inscriptions, and literary texts from a wide variety of genres.

        Candidates should be familiar with the archaeology and major monuments of the period at the following sites and cities: Rome, Pompeii, Ostia, Beneventum, Tivoli; Fishbourne, Vindolanda, Hadrian’s Wall; Timgad, Djemila; Athens, Aphrodisias, Ephesos, Masada. They should also show knowledge of written texts as specified for this course in the handbook for the Honour School of Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.]

        [For students starting from MT 2015: 621:  Rome, Italy and the Hellenistic East c. 300-100 BC: archaeology and history

        622:  Imperial Culture and Society, c. AD 50-150: archaeology and history] 

    • B. Core Papers: Classical Archaeology

      • [For students starting before MT 2015: i. The Greeks and the Mediterranean World, c. 950-500 BC

        As specified for the Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject IV.1.

      • ii. Greek Art and Archaeology c.500-300 BC

        As specified for the Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject IV.2.

      • iii. Cities and Settlement under the Empire

        As specified for the Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject IV.4.

      • iv. Art under the Roman Empire, 14-337

        As specified for the Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject IV.4.]

      • [For students starting from MT 2015: 601: The Greeks and the Mediterranean World, c. 950-500 BC

        602: Greek Art and Archaeology c.500-300 BC

        604: Art under the Roman Empire, AD 14-337

        605: Roman Archaeology: Cities and Settlement under the Empire]

    • C. Core Papers: Ancient History

      • [For students starting before MT 2014: i. Thucydides and the Greek World 479-403 BC

        As specified for the Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject 1.2, except that candidates in Classical Archaeology and Ancient History will answer four questions.

      • ii. Alexander the Great and his Early Successors

        As specified for the Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject I. 8.

      • iii. Roman History 146-46 BC

        As specified for the Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject I.5; candidates in Classical Archaeology and Ancient History will answer four questions.

      • iv. The Greek City in the Roman world from Dio Chrysostom to John Chrysostom

        The paper will be examined by a single 3-hour written paper combining compulsory and optional passages for comment and essay questions. Commentary on passages from documentary and legal texts will be compulsory.]

      • [For students starting from MT 2014: 408: Alexander the Great and his Early Successors (336 BC-302 BC)

        471: The Greek City in the Roman World from Dio Chrysostom to John Chrysostom

        482: Thucydides and the Greek World 479-403 BC

        485: Republic in Crisis: 146-46 BCRoman History 146-46 BC]

    • D. Further Papers: Classical Archaeology

      • [For students starting before MT 2015: i. Egyptian Art and Architecture

      • ii. The Archaeology of Minoan Crete, 3200-1000 BC

      • iii. Etruscan Italy, 900‐300 BC

      • Candidates should be familiar with the relevant archaeology of the following cities and sites: Tarquinia, Caere, Veii, Vulci, Rome, Marzabotto, Populonia, Pyrgi, Gravisca, Orvieto, Cortona, and Acquarossa.

      • iv. Science-Based Methods in Archaeology

      • v. Greek and Roman Coins

        Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the principal developments in coinage from its beginnings c.600 BC until the reign of Diocletian (AD 284-305). Emphasis will be placed on the ways in which numismatic evidence may be used to address questions of historical and archaeological interest.

      • vi. Mediterranean Maritime Archaeology

      • vii. The Archaeology of the Late Roman Empire, AD 284-641

        The paper studies the archaeology and art of the Roman Empire from Diocletian through the death of Heraclius. Subjects include urban change; development of the countryside in the east; industry; patterns of trade; persistence of pagan art; and the impact of Christianity (church building, pilgrimage, monasticism) on architecture and art. The main sites to be studied are Rome, Constantinople, Trier, Verulamium, Ravenna, Justiniana Prima, Caesarea Maritima, Scythopolis, Jerusalem and sites in the Roman provinces of Syria and Palestine.]

      • [For students starting from MT 2015: 631: Egyptian Art and Architecture

        632: The Archaeology of Minoan Crete, 3200-1000 BC

        633: Etruscan Italy, 900‐300 BC

        634: Science-Based Methods in Archaeology

        635: Greek and Roman Coins

        636: Mediterranean Maritime Archaeology

        637: The Archaeology of the Late Roman Empire, AD 284-641]

    • E. Further Papers: Ancient History

      • [For students starting before MT 2015: i. Epigraphy of the Greek and/or Roman World

        The course focuses on the inscribed text, mainly on stone and bronze, as monument, physical object and medium of information, and it explores the evidence of particular inscriptions, or groups of inscriptions, for the political, social, and economic history of communities in the ancient world. Candidates may show knowledge of either Archaic-Classical Greek, or Hellenistic, or Republican Roman or Imperial Roman inscriptions. They will be expected to show knowledge of epigraphic texts in Greek and/or in Latin (though all texts will be accompanied by translations).

      • ii. Athenian Democracy in the Classical Age

        As specified for the Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject I. 7.

      • iii. Sexuality and Gender in Greece and Rome

        As specified for the Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject I. 13.

      • iv. Cicero: Politics and Thought in the Late Republic

        As specified for the Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject I. 10.

      • v. Religions in the Greek and Roman World, 31 BC-AD 312

        As specified for the Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject I.12.

      • vi. St Augustine and the Last Days of Rome, 370-430

        Examined by a single 3-hour written paper combining passages for comment and essay questions.

    • Augustine, Against the Academics 2.2.4-6, 3.18-19, tr. J. O’Meara, Ancient Christian Writers 23 (Washington, DC, 1951).

      • Confessions, Books I–X, tr. H. Chadwick (Oxford, 1991), pp. 1-220 (recommended to buy)

        City of God, Books XIV, XIX tr. H. Bettenson (Harmondsworth, 1972), pp. 547-94; 842-94

        Letters 10, 15, 16, 17, 188, 209, 262, tr. E. Hill The Works of St Augustine (New York, 2003-04), II/1, 33-5, 45-50; II/3, 252-59, 394-97; II/4, 203-09

        Letters 10*, 12*, 20*, 24*, tr. R. Eno, Saint Augustine: Letters 1*-29* (Washington, DC, 1989), pp. 75-80, 100-08, 133-49, 172-4 (Also online via Questia)

        Sermons 198 (Dolbeau 26), 355, 356, tr. E. Hill (New York, 1997) III/11, 180-228, III/10, 166-84

        Sermon on the Sack of Rome, tr. M. O’Reilly (Washington, DC 1955)

    • Ammianus Marcellinus, The Later Roman Empire [Res Gestae ], Book 14.6; 27.3, 6-7, 9, 11; 28.1, 4; 29. 2; 30. 5-9, 31.1-2, 12-14, tr. J. C. Rolfe, Loeb Classical Library 3 vols. (Cambridge, MA, 1935). I, 35-53, III, 13-21, 45-51, 57-63, 73-77, 87-123, 137-61, 215-33, 335-73, 377-409, 463-89 (Also online at http://penelope.uchicago.edu)

    • Ausonius, The Professors of Bordeaux, tr. H.G. Evelyn White, Loeb Classical Library 2 vols. (Cambridge Mass., 1921), I, 97-139.

      • Letters 12 and 22, tr. White, II, 33-41, 71-8 (Also online at http://www.archive.org)

    • Symmachus, Letters, Book I. 3, 10, 12, 14, 20, 23, 32, 43, 47-9, 51-3, 58-9, 61, 99; Book III. 36; Book VI. 67 (special translation)

      • Relatio 3, tr. B. Croke & J. Harries, Religious Conflict in Fourth-Century Rome (Sydney, 1982), Document 40, pp. 35-40

      • Relationes 10-12, tr. R.H. Barrow, Prefect and Emperor (Oxford, 1973), pp. 73-81

    • Ambrose, Letters 17 and 18 (now known as 72 and 73), tr. Croke & Harries, Religious Conflict, Documents 39 and 41, pp. 30-35, 40-50

      • Letters 75, 75a, 76, 77, tr. W. Liebeschuetz Ambrose of Milan : political letters and speeches (Liverpool, 2005/2010), pp.124-73

    • Jerome, Letters 22, 45, 107, tr. F.A. Wright, Jerome: Select Letters Loeb Classical Library (London, 1933), pp. 531-59, 177-79, 229-65 (online at http://www.archive.org)

      • Letter 130, tr. Nicene and Post Nicene Fathers, II.6, 261-272 (Online at http://www.ccel.org)

    • Pelagius, Letter to Demetrias, tr. B. R. Rees (Woodbridge, 1991), pp. 29-70

    • The Life of Melania the Younger, tr. E. Clark (Lewiston, NY, 1984), pp. 25-82

    • The Theodosian Code, tr. C. Pharr (Princeton, 1952), Book IX. Title 16. paras 4-11; IX. 17.6-7; XII.1 56, 63, 77, 87, 98, 104, 110, 112, 116, 122; XIII. 3, 6-12; XIV. 9.1; XVI. 1.2, 4; XVI. 2.20; XVI. 5.3, 6-7, 9; XVI. 10.4-13

    • Dessau, Inscriptiones Latinae Selectae, nos. 754, 1256, 1258-61, 1265, 294-67, 2951

    • Diehl, Inscriptiones Latinae Christianae Veteres, nos. 63, 104, and 1700

    • Monica’s epitaph]

      • [For students starting from MT 2015: 407: Athenian Democracy in the Classical Age

        410: Cicero: Politics and Thought in the Late Republic

        412: Religions in the Greek and Roman World, c.31 BC-AD 312

        413: Sexuality and Gender in Greece and Rome

        472: St Augustine and the Last Days of Rome, 370-430

        473: Epigraphy of the Greek and/or Roman World]

    • F. Classical Languages

      • [For students starting before MT 2015: i. Intermediate Ancient Greek

        (This paper is available only to those undergraduates who offered Prelims paper C.I and, with the permission of the Standing Committee, to others with equivalent knowledge of Ancient Greek. It is not normally available to candidates with a qualification in Ancient Greek above AS-level or equivalent, nor to those who took paper C.3 Intermediate Greek in the preliminary examination.)

        A detailed specification and prescribed texts for the paper will be published in the Classical Archaeology and Ancient History FHS handbook not later than Monday of Week 0 of the Michaelmas Term preceding the examination.

      • ii. Intermediate Latin

        (This paper is available only to those undergraduates who offered Prelims paper C.2 and, with the permission of the Standing Committee, to others with equivalent knowledge of Latin. It is not normally available to candidates with a qualification in Latin above AS-level or equivalent, nor to those who took paper C.4 Intermediate Latin in the preliminary examination.)

        A detailed specification and prescribed texts for the paper will be published in the Classical Archaeology and Ancient History FHS handbook not later than Monday of Week 0 of the Michaelmas Term preceding the examination.

        iii. Advanced Ancient Greek

        This paper is designed for those with AS or A2 level Greek. Candidates will be expected to show an advanced level of knowledge of Greek grammar and vocabulary (including all syntax and morphology, as laid out in Abbot and Mansfield, Primer of Greek Accidence).

        There will be one three-hour paper comprising passages for translation from set texts, grammatical questions on the prepared texts and unseen translation. A detailed specification and prescribed texts for the paper will be published in the Classical Archaeology and Ancient History FHS course handbook not later than Monday of Week 0 of the Michaelmas Term preceding the examination.

        iv. Advanced Latin

        This paper is designed for those with AS or A2 level Latin. Candidates will be expected to show an advanced level of knowledge of Latin grammar and vocabulary (including all syntax and morphology, as laid out in Kennedy’s Revised Latin Primer).

        There will be one three-hour paper comprising passages for translation from set texts, grammatical questions on the prepared texts and unseen translation. A detailed specification and prescribed texts for the paper will be published in the Classical Archaeology and Ancient History FHS course handbook not later than Monday of Week 0 of the Michaelmas Term preceding the examination.]

      [For students starting from MT 2015: Each subject will be examined in one paper of three hours. Detailed specifications and prescribed texts for subjects 571-574 will be published in the CAAH Finals handbook not later than Monday of Week 5 of Hilary Term two years preceding the examination.

      • 571: Intermediate Ancient Greek This paper is available only to those undergraduates who offered Prelims paper C.1 and, with the permission of the Standing Committee, to others with equivalent knowledge of Ancient Greek. It is not normally available to candidates with a qualification in Ancient Greek above AS-level or equivalent, nor to those who took paper C.3 Intermediate Greek in the preliminary examination.

        572: Intermediate Latin This paper is available only to those undergraduates who offered Prelims paper C.2 and, with the permission of the Standing Committee, to others with equivalent knowledge of Latin. It is not normally available to candidates with a qualification in Latin above AS-level or equivalent, nor to those who took paper C.4 Intermediate Latin in the preliminary examination.

        573: Advanced Ancient Greek This paper is designed for those with AS or A2 level Greek.

        574: Advanced Latin This paper is designed for those with AS or A2 level Latin.]

  • VII A Site or Museum report, prepared in accordance with Regulation 3 below. The report must be on

    • Either

      • A. an excavation or archaeological site, based as far as possible on participation or autopsy and on a consideration of all relevant historical and archaeological sources;

    • Or

      • B. a coherent body of finds from one site or of one category, based as far as possible on autopsy and on a consideration of all relevant historical and archaeological sources.

  • VIII An optional Additional Thesis, prepared in accordance with Regulation 3 below.

    • 2. Candidates may also be examined viva voce.

    • [For students starting before MT 2015: 3. Theses.]

    • [For students starting from MT 2015: 3. Theses and Site or Museum reports.]

      • (a) This regulation governs theses submitted under Regulation 1.VIII, and the Site or Museum report submitted under 1.VII.

        [For students starting before MT 2015: (b) The subjects for all theses and for the Site or Museum report must, to the satisfaction of the Standing Committee, fall within the scope of the Honour School of Classical Archaeology and Ancient History. The subject may, but need not, overlap any subject on which the candidate offers papers. Candidates are warned that they should avoid repetition in papers of materials used in their theses, and that substantial repetition may be penalised.

        (c) Candidates proposing to offer a thesis must submit the following through their college, to the Secretary of the Standing Committee not later than the Friday of the second week of Trinity Full Term preceding the year of the final examination: (i) the title of the proposed thesis or report, together with (ii) a synopsis of the subject in about 100 words and (iii) a letter of approval from their tutor. The Standing Committee shall decide as soon as possible whether or not to approve the title and shall advise the candidate immediately. No decision shall be deferred beyond the end of the sixth week of the Trinity Full Term preceding the year of the final examination

        (d) Every thesis or report shall be the candidate's own work. Tutors may, however, discuss with candidates the field of study, the sources available, and the method of presentation, and may also read and comment on a first draft. The amount of assistance a candidate may receive shall not exceed an amount equivalent to the teaching of a normal paper. Candidates shall make a declaration that the thesis or report is their own work, and their tutors shall countersign the declaration confirming that, to the best of their knowledge and belief, this is so. This declaration must be placed in a sealed envelope bearing the candidate's examination number and presented together with the thesis or report.

        (e) Theses and reports previously submitted for the Honour School of Classical Archaeology and Ancient History may be resubmitted. No thesis or report shall be accepted which has already been submitted, wholly or substantially, for another Honour School or degree of this or any other institution, and the certificate shall also state that the thesis or report has not been so submitted. No thesis or report shall, however, be ineligible because it has been or is being submitted for any prize of this university.]

      • [For students starting from MT 2015: (b) The subjects for all theses and for the Site or Museum report must, to the satisfaction of the Standing Committee, fall within the scope of the Honour School of Classical Archaeology and Ancient History. The subject may, but need not, overlap any subject on which the candidate offers papers. Candidates should avoid repetition in papers of materials used in their theses, and may be penalised for substantial repetition.

        (c) Candidates must submit the following to the Academic Support Officer, Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’, not later than the Friday of Week 1 of Trinity Full Term in their second year: (i) the title of the proposed thesis or report, together with (ii) a synopsis of the subject in about 100 words. The Standing Committee shall decide whether or not to approve the title and shall advise the candidate as soon as possible.

        (d) Every thesis or report shall be the candidate's own work. Tutors may, however, discuss with candidates the field of study, the sources available, and the method of presentation, and may also read and comment on a first draft. The amount of assistance a candidate may receive shall not exceed an amount equivalent to the teaching of a normal paper. Candidates must submit a signed declaration that the thesis or report is their own work.

        (e) Theses and reports previously submitted for the Honour School of Classical Archaeology and Ancient History may be resubmitted. No thesis or report shall be accepted which has already been submitted, wholly or substantially, for another Honour School or degree of this or any other institution. No thesis or report shall, however, be ineligible because it has been or is being submitted for any prize of this university.]

        [For students starting before MT 2016: (f) Candidates should aim at a length of 10,000 words but must not exceed 15,000 words (both figures inclusive of notes and appendices but excluding bibliography). No person or body shall have authority to permit the limit of 15,000 words to be exceeded. Where appropriate, there shall be a select bibliography and a list of sources.]

      • [For students starting from MT 2016: (f) No Site or Museum Report or Thesis shall exceed 10,000 words (the limit to include all notes and appendices but not including the bibliography). No person or body shall have authority to permit the limit of 10,000 words to be exceeded. Where appropriate, there shall be a select bibliography and a list of sources.]

      • [For students starting before MT 2015: (g)  All theses and reports must be typed in double spacing on one side only of quarto or A4 paper with any notes and references at the foot of each page, and must be bound or held firmly in a stiff cover and identified by the candidate's examination number only. Two copies of each thesis or report shall be submitted to the examiners. Any candidate wishing to have one copy of his or her thesis or report returned must enclose with it, in an envelope bearing only his or her candidate number, a self-addressed sticky label.]

      • [For students starting from MT 2015: (g) All theses and reports must be typed in double spacing and printed on one side only with any notes and references at the foot of each page.]

        [For students starting before MT 2016: (h) Candidates wishing to change the title of a thesis or report after it has been approved may apply for permission for the change to be granted by the Chair of the Standing Committee (if the application is made before the first day of Hilary Full Term preceding the examination) or (if later) the Chair of the Examiners, Honour School of Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.]

      • [For students starting from MT 2016: (h) Candidates wishing to change the title of a thesis or report after it has been approved may apply for permission to make the change to the Chair of the Standing Committee for Classical Archaeology and Ancient History, c/o the Academic Administrative Officer (email: undergraduate@classics.ox.ac.uk) no later than 5 pm on the Friday two weeks before the submission deadline.]

        [For students starting before MT 2015: (i) Candidates shall submit any thesis or report, identified by the candidates' examination number only, not later than noon on Friday of the week after the Hilary Full Term preceding the examination to the Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, addressed to the Chair of the Examiners, Honour School of Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.]

      • [For students starting from MT 2015: (i) Candidates shall submit two copies of any thesis or report, identified by their candidate number only, not later than noon on Friday of Week 9 of the Hilary Full Term preceding the examination to the Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, addressed to the Chair of the Examiners, Honour School of Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.]