Honour School of Classics and English

A

  • 1. The Honour School of Classics and English shall be under the joint supervision of the Boards of the Faculties of Classics and English Language and Literature, and shall consist of such subjects as they shall jointly by regulation prescribe. The boards shall establish a joint committee consisting of three representatives of each faculty, of whom at least one on each side shall be a member of the respective faculty board, to advise them as necessary in respect of the examination and of the First Public Examination in Classics and English.

  • 2. No candidate shall be admitted to the examination in this school unless he or she has either passed or been exempted from the First Public Examination.

  • 3. No candidate shall be permitted to enter his or her name for the examination who has been adjudged worthy of Honours in Honour Moderations in Classics, or who has there satisfied the Moderators.

  • 4. The Chair of Examiners for the Honour School of English Language and Literature shall designate such of the number of the examiners as may be required for the English subjects of the examination for the Honour School of Classics and English, and the nominating committee for examiners appointed by the Board of the Faculty of Classics shall nominate such of the number of examiners as may be required for the Classics subjects of the examination. When these appointments have been made the number of examiners shall be deemed to be complete.

B

All candidates must take seven subjects. All candidates not taking subject 4(e), Second Classical Language, must offer A, two subjects in English, B, two subjects in Classics, C, two subjects linking both sides of the school, and D, a dissertation. The dissertation may be concentrated on English or on Classics, or may link both sides of the school.

Candidates who take 4(e), Second Classical Language will under C take only one subject, either subject 5 or one of the subjects under 6. The subjects will be examined by written examinations of three hours’ duration, unless otherwise specified.

A: ENGLISH

  • 1. One of the following periods of English literature:

    • (a) Literature in English 1350 – 1550 (one paper) [As specified for the Honour School of English Language and Literature Course I Subject 2];

      (b) Literature in English 1660 – 1760 (one paper) [As specified for the Honour School of English Language and Literature Course I Subject 4];

      (c) Literature in English 1760 – 1830 (one paper) [As specified for the Honour School of English Language and Literature Course I Subject 5].

  • 2. One of the following:

    • (a) a second of the periods specified in 1 above;

      (b) Shakespeare (portfolio) [As specified for the Honour School of English Language and Literature Course I, Subject 1];

      (c) The Material Text (portfolio) [As specified for the Honour School of English Language and Literature Course II, Subject 5(a)];

      (d) any of the Special Options subjects from the list for the year concerned, which will be published by the English Faculty Office in the year preceding the examination (extended essay) [As specified for the Honour School of English Language and Literature Course I, Subject 6];

      (e) any of the Special Options subjects for English Course II, Medieval Literature and Language, from the list for the year concerned [As specified for the Honour School of English Language and Literature Course II, Subject 6];

  • provided that candidates who offer (b), (c), (d), and (e) avoid duplicating, in their answers to one paper, material that they have already used in answering another paper.

B: CLASSICS

Subjects [For students starting before MT 2016: 401-13] [For students starting from MT 2016: 401-14], 501-54 and 566-9 below will be set in accordance with the regulations for the Honour School of Literae Humaniores. For each subject, a detailed specification and prescribed texts will be given in the Greats Handbook applicable to the relevant year of examination. The handbook will be published by Monday of Week 5 of Hilary Term two years preceding the examination.

Any candidate whose native language is not English may bring a bilingual (native language to English) dictionary for use in any examination paper where candidates are required to translate Ancient Greek and/or Latin texts into English.

  • 3. Either 501: Greek Core (one paper of three hours (commentary and essay) with an additional paper (one-and-a-half hours) of translation);

  • or 502: Latin Core (one paper of three hours (commentary and essay) with an additional paper (one-and-a-half hours) of translation).

  • 4. One subject from (a)-(e) below.

  • Notes:

    • (i) Subject (e), Second Classical Language, counts as two subjects; hence candidates offering it should offer only one subject under section C.

      (ii) Each of the subjects 503: Historiography, 504: Lyric Poetry and 507: Comedy will be examined by an extended essay of 5,000–6,000 words and a one-and-a-half-hour translation paper, as specified in the Regulations for the Honour School of Literae Humaniores.

      (iii) University classes will be given for only one of options [For students starting before MT 2016: 514 and 515] [For students starting from MT 2016: 515 and 524] each year.

      (iv) It cannot be guaranteed that university lectures or classes or college teaching will be available on all subjects in every academic year. Candidates are advised to consult their tutors about the availability of teaching when selecting their subjects.

      (a) Greek and Latin Literature

      • Either 501: Greek Core or 502: Latin Core (whichever is not offered under 3 above).

        503: Historiography

        504: Lyric Poetry

        506: Greek Tragedy

        507: Comedy

        508: Hellenistic Poetry

        509: Cicero

        510: Ovid

        511: Latin Didactic

        512: Neronian Literature

        513: Euripides, Orestes: papyri, manuscripts, text

        [For students starting before MT 2016: 514: Seneca, Agamemnon: manuscripts, text, interpretation]

        515: Catullus: manuscripts, text, interpretation

        [For students starting from MT 2016: 516: The Conversion of Augustine]

        517: Byzantine Literature

        518: Modern Greek Poetry

      • [For students starting from MT 2016: 524: Seneca, Medea: manuscripts, text, interpretation]

        599: Thesis in Literature

    • (b) Philology and Linguistics

      • 551: Greek Historical Linguistics

        552: Latin Historical Linguistics

        553: General Linguistics and Comparative Philology

        554: Comparative Philology: Indo-European, Greek and Latin

    • (c) Ancient and Medieval Philosophy, as specified in the Regulations for Philosophy in all Honour Schools including Philosophy.

      • 110: Aquinas

        111: Duns Scotus, Ockham

        115: Plato, Republic (in translation)

        116:  Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics (in translation)

        130: Plato, Republic (in Greek)

        [For students starting before MT 2018: 131: Plato, Theaetetus and Sophist

        132: Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics, (in Greek)

        133: Aristotle, Physics

        134: Sextus Empiricus, Outlines of Pyrrhonism

        135: Latin Philosophy]

      • [For students starting from MT 2018: 131: Plato on Knowledge, Language, & Reality in the Theaetetus & Sophist (in Greek)

        132: Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics, (in Greek)

        133: Aristotle on Nature, Life and Mind (in Greek)

        134: Knowledge and Scepticism in Hellenistic Philosophy (in Greek)

        135: Latin Philosophy (in Latin)

        136: Knowledge and Scepticism in Hellenistic Philosophy (in Latin)

        137: Plato on Knowledge, Language, & Reality in the Theaetetus & Sophist (in translation)

        138: Aristotle on Nature, Life and Mind (in translation)

        139: Knowledge and Scepticism in Hellenistic Philosophy (in translation)]

    • (d) Greek and Roman History

      • 401: The Early Greek World and Herodotus' Histories: 650 to 479 BC

        402: Thucydides and the Greek World: 479 to 403 BC

        403: The End of the Peloponnesian War to the Death of Philip II of Macedon: 403 to 336 BC

        404: Polybius, Rome and the Mediterranean: 241-146 BC

        405: Republic in Crisis: 146-46 BC

        406: Rome, Italy and Empire from Caesar to Claudius: 46 BC to AD 54

        407: Athenian Democracy in the Classical Age

        408: Alexander the Great and his Early Successors

        409: The Hellenistic World: Societies and Cultures c.300-100

        410: Cicero: Politics and Thought in the Late Republic. This subject may not be combined with 509: Cicero

        411: Politics, Society and Culture from Nero to Hadrian

        412: Religions in the Greek and Roman World, c.31 BC-AD 312

        413:  Sexuality and Gender in Greece and Rome

      • [For students starting from MT 2016: 414: The Conversion of Augustine]

    • Note:[For students starting before MT 2017: Candidates offering any of subjects 401-406 must also offer the associated translation paper set in the Honour School of Literae Humaniores.] [For students starting from MT 2017: Each of the subjects 401-6 will be examined in a three-hour essay paper and a one-and-a-half hour paper comprising passages for translation and comment from the prescribed texts, as specified for the Honour School of Literae Humaniores.]

      (e) Second Classical Language. As specified for the Honour School of Literae Humaniores (VI). Candidates who offer a Second Classical Language must offer either both subjects in Greek (566/568) or both subjects in Latin (567/569), and may not offer either subject in a language in which they satisfied the Examiners in the Preliminary Examination in Classics and English.

 C. LINK PAPERS

Detailed prescriptions and set texts for link papers will be provided in the Classics and English FHS handbook for the relevant year of examination.

  • 5. Epic (one paper of three hours plus 15 minutes’ reading time)

    6. One of the following:

    • (a) Tragedy. This subject may not be combined with 506: Greek Tragedy.

      (b) Comedy. This subject may not be combined with 507: Comedy.

      (c) The Reception of Classical Literature in Poetry in English since 1900

    • This paper will be examined by an extended essay of 5,000-6,000 words. Essay topics set by the examiners will be released on Monday of Week 6 of the Hilary Term preceding the final examination and essays should be submitted by Monday of Week 10 of the same term (12 noon) to the Examination Schools, High Street. Candidates will be required to use at least three authors in their essays, at least one of whom must be a classical author. This subject may NOT be combined with subjects 503, 504, or 507. Candidates must avoid repetition in this paper of material used in Paper 2(d).

 D: DISSERTATION

  • 1. All candidates for the Honour School of Classics and English must offer a dissertation.

    • (i) The subject of the dissertation must be substantially connected with any subject area in Literae Humaniores and/or English Language and Literature.

      (ii) The subject of the dissertation may, but need not, overlap any subject or period on which the candidate offers papers. Candidates are warned, however, that they must avoid repetition in their papers of materials used in their dissertation, and that they will not be given credit for material extensively repeated.

      (iii) Candidates must submit a dissertation abstract of no more than 100 words, to the Chair of Examiners in Classics and English, care of the English Faculty Office, by 5 p.m. on Thursday of the eighth week of the Michaelmas term preceding the examination.

      (iv) The Chair of Examiners in Classics and English will decide as soon as possible, and in every case by Thursday of the first week of the Hilary Term preceding the examination, whether or not to approve the abstract, and will advise candidates of the decision forthwith.

  • 2. The candidate may not discuss with any tutor either his or her choice of content or the method of handling it after Friday of the sixth week of the Hilary Term preceding the examination.

    Candidates must sign a certificate stating that the dissertation is their own work, and that they have read the Joint School guidelines on plagiarism (see also 3 below). This certificate must be placed in a sealed envelope bearing the candidate’s examination number and presented together with the dissertation.

    3. Dissertations previously submitted for the Honour School of Classics and English may be re-submitted. No dissertation will be accepted if it has already been submitted, wholly or substantially, for any other degree of this or any other university; and the certificate must also contain confirmation that the dissertation has not already been so submitted.

    4. No dissertation shall be ineligible because it has been submitted, in whole or in part, for any scholarship or prize of this University advertised in the University Gazette.

    5. The dissertation shall be of 7,000-8,000 words; failure to keep to these limits is liable to be penalized. In the case of a commentary on a text, and at the discretion of the Chair of the Examiners, any substantial quoting of that text need not be included in the word-count. There must be a select bibliography and, if appropriate, list of sources.

    6. Two typed copies of the dissertation must be delivered to the Chair of Examiners, Honour School of Classics and English, Examination Schools, High Street, by noon on Tuesday of the ninth week of Hilary Term preceding the examination.