Honour School of Literae Humaniores

A

  • 1. The Branches of the Honour School of Literae Humaniores shall be (I) Greek and Roman History, (II) Philosophy, (III) Greek and Latin Literature, (IV) Greek and Roman Archaeology, (V) Philology and Linguistics, (VI) Second Classical Language.

  • 2. Each candidate must offer at least two of Branches (I)-(V).

  • 3. No candidate shall be admitted to the examination in this school unless he or she has either passed or been exempted from the First Public Examination.

  • 4. The examination in this school shall be under the joint supervision of the Boards of the Faculties of Classics and Philosophy, which shall appoint a joint standing committee to make regulations concerning it and review its operation, subject always to the preceding clauses of this subsection.

B

  • 1. Candidates shall take either Course I or Course II. Persons who have satisfied the Moderators in Course IA, IB, or IC of Honour Moderations in Classics or of the Preliminary Examination in Classics may not enter for the Honour School of Literae Humaniores Course II without permission from the Board of the Faculty of Classics after consultation where appropriate with the Board of the Faculty of Philosophy. Such permission, which will be given only for special reasons, must be sought as early as possible, and in no case later than noon on the Friday of the first week of Michaelmas Term before the examination, by writing to the Chair of the Board of the Faculty of Classics, c/o 66 St Giles'. Applications must be accompanied by a letter of support from the applicant's society.

  • 2. Candidates must offer eight subjects[For students starting before MT 2016: (and any associated papers of translation)], which may include: up to five subjects in Greek and Roman History; up to five subjects in Philosophy; up to five subjects in Greek and Latin Literature; up to two subjects (or up to three, if one is a thesis [699]) in Greek and Roman Archaeology; up to two subjects (or up to three, if one is a thesis [598]) in Philology and Linguistics; two subjects in Second Classical Language; except that (i) candidates in Course I may not offer Second Classical Language and (ii) candidates in Course II who offer Second Classical Language may not offer more than four subjects in any one of Greek and Roman History, Philosophy, and Greek and Latin Literature. The combinations of subjects permitted are set out in I-VI below. Candidates may offer a thesis as one of their subjects, with the proviso that those offering a thesis in Philosophy must offer at least three other subjects in Philosophy. No candidate may offer more than one thesis, except that a Special Thesis may be offered in addition to one other thesis.

  • 3. All candidates must offer at least four text-based subjects, except that candidates in Course II who offer Second Classical Language must offer at least three text-based subjects. All candidates in Course I must offer at least one text-based subject in each of (1) Greek and (2) Latin. Some subjects (503, 504, 507) may count as text-based subjects in either Greek or Latin. The text-based subjects are as follows:

    • (1) in Greek

      • 130: Plato, Republic

      • 131: [For students starting before MT 2017: Plato, Theaetetus and Sophist] [For students starting from MT 2017: Plato on Knowledge, Language, & Reality in the Theaetetus & Sophist]

      • 132: Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics

      • 133: [For students starting before MT 2017: Aristotle, Physics] [For students starting from MT 2017: Aristotle on Nature, Life and Mind]

      • 134: [For students starting before MT 2017: Sextus Empiricus] [For students starting from MT 2017: Knowledge and Scepticism in Hellenistic Philosophy]

      • 401: Greek History 1

      • 402: Greek History 2

      • 403: Greek History 3

      • 404: Roman History 4

      • 501: Greek Core, if offered in version (a)

      • 503: Historiography, if offered in version (a) or (b)

      • 504: Lyric Poetry, if offered in version (a) or (b)

      • 505: Early Greek Hexameter Poetry

      • 506: Greek Tragedy

      • 507: Comedy, if offered in version (a) or (b)

      • 508: Hellenistic Poetry

      • 513: Euripides, Orestes

      • 517: Byzantine Literature

      • 518: Modern Greek Poetry

      • 551: Greek Historical Linguistics

    • (2) in Latin

      • 135: Latin Philosophy

      • [For students starting from MT 2017: 136: Knowledge and Scepticism in Hellenistic Philosophy]

      • 405: Roman History 5

      • 406: Roman History 6

      • [For students starting from MT 2015: 414: The Conversion of Augustine]

      • 502: Latin Core, if offered in version (a)

      • 503: Historiography, if offered in version (a) or (c)

      • 504: Lyric Poetry, if offered in version (a) or (c)

      • 507: Comedy if offered in version (a) or (c)

      • 509: Cicero

      • 510: Ovid

      • 511: Latin Didactic

      • 512: Neronian Literature

      • [For students starting before MT 2015: 514: Seneca, Agamemnon]

      • 515: Catullus

      • [For students starting before MT 2015: 516: The Conversion of Augustine]

      • [For students starting from MT 2015: 524: Seneca, Medea]

      • 552: Latin Historical Linguistics

  • 4. In the assignment of honours all eight subjects offered by a candidate shall count equally.[For students starting before MT 2016: In assessing a candidate's performance in a subject, the examiners shall have regard to performance in any associated translation papers.]

  • 5. In addition to their eight subjects candidates may also offer, but are not required to offer, a Special Thesis in accordance with VII below.

  • 6. Any candidate whose native language is not English may bring a bilingual (native language to English) dictionary for use in any examination paper where candidates are required to translate Ancient Greek and/or Latin texts into English.

  • 7. For each subject in I, III, IV, V and VI below, a detailed specification and (where applicable) prescribed texts will be given in the Greats Handbook applicable to the relevant year of examination. The handbook will be published no later than Monday of Week 5 of Hilary Term two years preceding the examination.

I. Greek and Roman History

Candidates may offer up to five subjects (or up to four if they are offering Second Classical Language in Course II). If they offer more than one subject, at least one must be taken from A below; if they offer more than three subjects, at least two must be taken from A; if they offer five subjects, at least three must be taken from A.

[For students starting before MT 2016: One three-hour paper will be set on each subject except 499. For all of the period subjects which they offer under A as text-based (401-6), candidates will be required to sit an associated paper (one-and-a-half hours) comprising translation from the prescribed texts.]

[For students starting from MT 2016: For all of the period subjects which they offer under A as text-based (401-6), candidates will be required to sit a three-hour essay paper and an associated paper (one-and-a-half hours) comprising passages for translation and comment from the prescribed texts. For any of the period subjects which they offer as non-text-based (421-6), candidates will be required to sit a three-hour essay paper and an associated paper (one-and-a-half hours) comprising passages from the prescribed texts in English translation for comment. Each of subjects 407-414 will be examined in one three-hour paper.]

A. Greek and Roman History Periods

In Course I all period subjects must be offered as text-based. Course II candidates who are taking period subjects must offer at least one as text-based, and may not offer more than one as non-text-based. Course IIA candidates taking Roman History 5 and 6 must offer them as text-based papers; Course IIB candidates taking Greek History 1-3 and Roman History 4 must offer them as text-based papers.

  • Greek History 1 (401 text-based; 421 non text-based): [For students starting before MT 2018: The Early Greek World and Herodotus' Histories: 650 to 479 bc]  [For students starting from MT 2018:  Archaic Greek History: c750 to 479 BC]

    Greek History 2 (402 text-based; 422 non text-based: Thucydides and the Greek World: 479 to 403 bc

  • Greek History 3 (403 text-based; 423 non text-based): The End of the Peloponnesian War to the Death of Philip II of Macedon: 403 to 336 bc

  • Roman History 4 (404 text-based; 424 non text-based): Polybius, Rome and the Mediterranean: 241-146 bc

    Roman History 5 (405 text-based; 425 non text-based): Republic in Crisis: 146-46 bc

  • Roman History 6 (406 text-based; 426 non text-based): Rome, Italy and Empire from Caesar to Claudius: 46 bc to ad 54

B. Greek and Roman History Topics

  • Note: It cannot be guaranteed that university lectures or classes or college teaching will be available in all subjects in this section in every academic year. Candidates are advised to consult their tutors about the availability of teaching when selecting their subjects.

  • 407: Athenian Democracy in the Classical Age

  • 408: Alexander the Great and his Early Successors (336 BC-302 BC)

  • 409: The Hellenistic World: Societies and Cultures (c.300-100 BC)

  • 410: Cicero: Politics and Thought in the Late Republic. This subject may not be combined with subject 509 Cicero.

  • 411: Politics, Society and Culture from Nero to Hadrian

  • 412: Religions in the Greek and Roman World (c.31 BC-AD 312)

  • 413: Sexuality and Gender in Greece and Rome[For students starting from MT 2018: . This subject may only be taken by candidates who are offering at least one Ancient History period subject from section I. A. (subjects 401-6 and 421-6).]

  • [For students starting from MT 2015: 414: The Conversion of Augustine]

  • [For students starting from MT 2018: 415: The Achaemenid Empire, 530-330 BC]

C.

  • 499: Thesis in Ancient History

    Any candidate who is not offering a thesis in any other branch of the examination may offer a thesis in Ancient History in accordance with the Regulations on Theses below.

II. Philosophy

Candidates may offer up to five subjects in Philosophy, from the list below. Candidates offering one Philosophy subject only may offer any of the subjects listed below except 199.[For students starting before MT 2017: Those offering at least two Philosophy subjects must select at least one subject in ancient philosophy, i.e. one of 115, 116, 130, 131, 132, 133, 134 and 135. Those offering three or more subjects must also select one subject from 101, 102, 103 and 108.] [For students starting from MT 2017: Those offering at least two Philosophy subjects must select at least one subject in ancient philosophy, i.e. one of 115, 116 or 130-139. Those offering three or more subjects must also select one non-ancient Philosophy subject, i.e. a subject other than 115, 116 or 130-139.] Candidates offering subject 199 (Thesis in Philosophy) must offer at least three other subjects in Philosophy. The syllabus for each subject, including thesis regulations, is specified in Regulations for Philosophy in all Honour Schools including Philosophy. In the list below, numbers in parentheses after a subject's title indicate other subjects with which it may not be combined.

[For students starting from MT 2015: Note on Subject 198: Special Subjects in Philosophy: Special subjects may from time to time be approved by the Undergraduate Studies Committee of the Faculty of Philosophy, as specified in the Regulations for Philosophy in all Honour Schools including Philosophy. Special subjects may not be available in all examination years, and not all such subjects may be available to candidates reading for the Honour School of Literae Humaniores.]

  • 101 Early Modern Philosophy

  • 102 Knowledge and Reality

  • 103 Ethics

  • 104 Philosophy of Mind

  • 106 Philosophy of Science and Social Science (124)

  • 107 Philosophy of Religion

  • 108 The Philosophy of Logic and Language

  • 109 Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Criticism

  • 110 Medieval Philosophy: Aquinas (111)

  • 111 Medieval Philosophy: Duns Scotus, Ockham (110)

  • 112 The Philosophy of Kant

  • 113 Post-Kantian Philosophy

  • 114 Theory of Politics

  • 115 Plato: Republic (in translation) (130)

  • 116 Aristotle: Nicomachean Ethics (in translation) (132)

  • [For students starting before MT 2017: 117 Frege, Russell, and Wittgenstein (118)

  • 118 The Later Philosophy of Wittgenstein (117)]

  • 120 Intermediate Philosophy of Physics

  • 122 Philosophy of Mathematics

  • 124 Philosophy of Science (106)

  • 125 Philosophy of Cognitive Science

    127 Philosophical Logic

  • [For students starting from MT 2016: 128 Practical Ethics]

  • [For students starting from MT 2017: 129 The Philosophy of Wittgenstein]

  • 130 Plato: Republic (in Greek) (115

  • 131 [For students starting before MT 2017: Plato: Theaetetus and Sophist (in Greek)] [For students starting from MT 2017: Plato on Knowledge, Language, & Reality in the Theaetetus & Sophist (in Greek) (137) ]

  • 132 Aristotle: Nicomachean Ethics (in Greek) (116)

  • 133 [For students starting before MT 2017: Aristotle: Physics (in Greek)] [For students starting from MT 2017: Aristotle on Nature, Life and Mind (in Greek) (138)]

  • 134 [For students starting before MT 2017: Sextus Empiricus: Outlines of Pyrrhonism (in Greek)] [For students starting from MT 2017: Knowledge and Scepticism in Hellenistic Philosophy (in Greek) (136, 139) ]

  • 135 Latin Philosophy (in Latin)

  • [For students starting from MT 2017: 136 Knowledge and Scepticism in Hellenistic Philosophy (in Latin) (134, 139)

    137 Plato on Knowledge, Language, & Reality in the Theaetetus & Sophist (in translation) (131)

    138 Aristotle on Nature, Life and Mind (in translation) (133)

    139 Knowledge and Scepticism in Hellenistic Philosophy (in translation) (134, 136)]

  • [For students starting from MT 2015: 198 Special Subjects in Philosophy (see note above)]

  • 199 Thesis in Philosophy (499, 598, 599, 699)

III. Greek and Latin Literature

Course I candidates may offer up to a maximum of five subjects from [For students starting before MT 2015: 501-522] [For students starting from MT 2015: 501-524] and 599 below. Course II candidates may offer up to a maximum of five subjects, or four if they take VI, Second Classical Language. Candidates offering three or more subjects must offer at least one of Greek Core (501 or 521) and Latin Core (502 or 522).

The following restrictions on combinations of literature subjects apply to both Course I and Course II candidates:

(1) Subject 521 may only be offered by Course II students taking Second Classical Language in Greek.  Subject 522 may only be offered by Course II students taking Second Classical Language in Latin.

(2) Only one of subjects 503, 504, 507 and 519 may be offered.

(3) [For students starting before MT 2015: Only one of subjects 514 and 515 may be offered.] [For students starting from MT 2015: Only one of subjects 515 and 524 may be offered.]

(4) Only one of subjects [For students starting before MT 2015: 516,] 517, 518 and 519 may be offered.

One three-hour paper will be set on each subject except 503, 504, 507, 519 and 599. Additional translation papers (one-and-a-half hours each) will be set on 501 and 502.

Note 1: Each of subjects 503, 504 and 507 will be examined by a one-and-a-half hour translation paper on the prescribed texts and an extended essay of up to 6,000 words. Each of these subjects is available in three versions: 

(a) Greek and Latin, for Course I candidates.

(b) Greek only, for Course II candidates or single-language candidates in Classics & English, Classics & Modern Languages, or Classics & Oriental Studies offering Greek.

(c) Latin only, for Course II candidates or single-language candidates in Classics & English, Classics & Modern Languages, or Classics & Oriental Studies offering Latin.

Essay topics set by the examiners will be released on Monday of Week 6 of Hilary Term immediately preceding the examination and essays should be submitted to the Examination Schools by 12 noon on Monday of Week 10 of the same term; at the same time candidates should email a searchable electronic version to undergraduate@classics.ox.ac.uk. Every extended essay must be the work of the candidate alone, and he or she must not discuss with any tutor either his or her choice of theme or the method of handling it.

Note 2: In all subjects credit will be given for showing wider knowledge of Greek and Roman culture.

Note 3: It cannot be guaranteed that university lectures or classes or college teaching will be available in all subjects in every academic year. Candidates are advised to consult their tutors about the availability of teaching when selecting their subjects.

501/521: Greek Core

Either:

(a) 501: One paper of three hours (commentary and essay) with an additional paper (one-and-a-half hours) of translation.

or

(b) 521: One paper of three hours (commentary and essay). Translations of the passages set for commentary will be provided. This version of the subject is only available to those taking VI. Second Classical Language in Greek and will not count as text-based.

502/522: Latin Core

Either:

(a) 502: One paper of three hours (commentary and essay) with an additional paper (one-and-a-half-hours) of translation.

or:

(b) 522: One paper of three hours (commentary and essay). Translations of the passages set for commentary will be provided. This version of the subject is only available to those taking VI. Second Classical Language in Latin and will not count as text-based.

503: Historiography

One of the following (see Note 1 above):

(a) Greek and Latin version

(b) Greek only version

(c) Latin only version

This subject may not be combined with 504, 507 or 519.

504: Lyric Poetry

One of the following (see Note 1 above):

(a) Greek and Latin version

(b) Greek only version

(c) Latin only version

This subject may not be combined with 503, 507 or 519.

505: Early Greek Hexameter Poetry

506: Greek Tragedy

507: Comedy

One of the following (see Note 1 above):

(a) Greek and Latin version

(b) Greek only version

(c) Latin only version

This subject may not be combined with 503, 504 or 519.

508: Hellenistic Poetry

509: Cicero

This subject may not be combined with 410, Cicero: Politics and Thought in the Late Republic.

510: Ovid

511: Latin Didactic

512: Neronian Literature

513: Euripides, Orestes: papyri, manuscripts, text

[For students starting before MT 2015: 514: Seneca, Agamemnon: manuscripts, text, interpretation

This subject may not be combined with 515.]

515: Catullus: manuscripts, text, interpretation

This subject may not be combined with [For students starting before MT 2015: 514] [For students starting from MT 2015: 524].

[For students starting before MT 2015: 516: The Conversion of Augustine

This subject may not be combined with 517, 518, or 519.]

517: Byzantine Literature

This subject may not be combined with [For students starting before MT 2015: 516,] 518 or 519.

518: Modern Greek Poetry

This subject may not be combined with [For students starting before MT 2015: 516,] 517 or 519.

519: The Reception of Classical Literature in Poetry in English since 1900

This paper will be examined only by extended essay of up to 6,000 words. Essay topics set by the examiners will be released on Monday of Week 6 of Hilary Term and essays should be submitted by 12 noon on Monday of Week 10 of the same term to the Examination Schools; at the same time candidates should email a searchable electronic version to undergraduate@classics.ox.ac.uk. Candidates will be required to use at least three authors in their essays, at least one of which must be a classical author. Every extended essay must be the work of the candidate alone, and he or she must not discuss with any tutor either his or her choice of theme or the method of handling it. This subject may not be combined with 503, 504, 507, [For students starting before MT 2015: 516,] 517 or 518.

[For students starting from MT 2015: 524: Seneca, Medea: manuscripts, text, interpretation.

This subject may not be combined with 515.]

599: Thesis in Literature

Any candidate may offer a thesis in Greek and Latin Literature in accordance with the Regulation on Theses below. This subject may not be combined with any of 199, 499, 598, or 699.

IV. Greek and Roman Archaeology

Course I and Course II: Candidates may offer one or two of the following subjects 601-605, and may, if they wish, offer subject 699 as well. They may also offer subject 699 as their sole Archaeology subject.

Each of subjects 601-605 will be examined in one paper (3 hours).

  • 601: The Greeks and the Mediterranean World c.950 bc -500 bc

    602: Greek Art and Archaeology, c.500-300 bc

  • 603: Hellenistic Art and Archaeology, 330 – 30 BC

  • 604: Art under the Roman Empire AD 14-337

  • 605: Roman Archaeology: Cities and Settlement under the Empire

  • 699: Thesis in Greek and Roman Archaeology

  • Any candidate may offer a thesis in Greek or Roman Archaeology in accordance with the Regulation on Theses below. This subject may not be combined with any of 199, 499, 598, or 599.

V. Philology and Linguistics

Course I and Course II: Candidates may offer one or two of subjects 551-554, and may if they wish offer subject 598 as well. They may also offer subject 598 as their sole Philology and Linguistics subject.

Each of subjects 551-554 will be examined in one paper (3 hours).

  • 551: Greek Historical Linguistics

    552: Latin Historical Linguistics

  • 553: General Linguistics and Comparative Philology

  • 554: Comparative Philology: Indo-European, Greek and Latin

  • This subject may not be offered by any candidate who offered the Special Subject Historical Linguistics and Comparative Philology in Honour Moderations in Classics or in the Preliminary Examination in Classics.

  • 598: Thesis in Philology and Linguistics

    Any candidate may offer a thesis in Philology and Linguistics in accordance with the Regulation on Theses below. This subject may not be combined with any of 199, 499, 599, or 699.

VI. Second Classical Language

Second Classical Language is available only in Course II. Candidates offering Second Classical Language who satisfied the Moderators in Course IIA of Honour Moderations in Classics or of Preliminary Examination in Classics must offer 566 and 568. Candidates offering Second Classical Language who satisfied the Moderators in Course IIB of Honour Moderations in Classics or of Preliminary Examination in Classics must offer 567 and 569. Each subject will be examined in one three-hour paper.

566: Greek Verse

567: Latin Verse

568: Greek Prose

569: Latin Prose

VII. Special Theses

Candidates may offer, but are not required to offer, a Special Thesis in addition to the eight subjects required above, in accordance with the Regulations on Theses below.

Regulation on Theses

  • 1. This regulation governs theses in Ancient History (subject 499), Literature (599), Archaeology (699), Philology and Linguistics (598), and Special Thesis (VII), with the exception of Special Theses on subjects relating to Philosophy. For theses in Philosophy (199) and Special Theses (VII) on Philosophy subjects, see Regulations for Philosophy in all Honour Schools including Philosophy.

  • 2. The subject of every thesis shall, to the satisfaction of the Standing Committee for Mods and Greats, fall within the scope of the Honour School of Literae Humaniores. The subject may but need not overlap any subject or period on which the candidate offers papers. Candidates should avoid repetition in examination essays of material used in their theses and may be penalised for substantial repetition. Candidates who offer a Special Thesis and another thesis must avoid all overlap between them.

  • 3. Candidates proposing to offer a thesis must submit to the Academic Administrative Officer of the Faculty of Classics, on a form obtainable from the Classics Office which must be countersigned by their tutor and (if different) by their proposed supervisor, the title of the proposed thesis, together with a synopsis of the subject in about 100 words, not later than the Wednesday of the first week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examination. The Standing Committee for Mods and Greats shall decide whether or not to approve the title and shall advise the candidate as soon as possible.

  • 4. Every thesis shall be the candidate's own work. Tutors may, however, assist candidates by discussing with them, for example, the field of study, the sources available, bibliography, and the method of presentation, and may also read and comment on drafts. The amount of assistance a candidate may receive shall not exceed an amount equivalent to the teaching of a normal paper. All quotations from primary or secondary sources, and all reporting or appropriation of material from those sources, must be explicitly acknowledged. Candidates must submit a signed declaration that the thesis is their own work.

  • 5. Theses previously submitted for the Honour School of Literae Humaniores may be resubmitted. No thesis shall be accepted which has already been submitted, wholly or substantially, for another Honour School or degree of this or any other institution, and the certificate shall also state that the thesis has not been so submitted. No thesis shall, however, be ineligible because it has been or is being submitted for any prize of this university.

  • 6. No thesis shall exceed 10,000 words[For students starting before MT 2015: (the limit to include all notes and appendices but not including the bibliography). No person or body shall have authority to permit the limit of 10,000 words to be exceeded, except that, in the case of a commentary on a text and at the discretion of the chair of examiners, any substantial quoting of that text or of any translation of that text need not be included in the word limit. Where appropriate, there shall be a select bibliography and a list of sources.] [For students starting from MT 2015: The word limit excludes bibliography and any appendix consisting of a catalogue of data, any research instrument used to gather data (for example, a computer programme), any extensive text which is specifically the object of an edition (e.g. a papyrus) or commentary, and any translation of that text, but includes quotations and footnotes. No person or body shall have authority to permit the limit of 10,000 words to be exceeded. ]

  • 7. All theses must be typed in double spacing on one side only, with any notes and references at the foot of each page.

  • [For students starting before MT 2016: 8. Candidates wishing to change the title of their thesis after it has been approved may apply for permission for the change to be granted by the Chair of the Standing Committee for Mods and Greats (if the application is made before the first day of Hilary Full Term preceding the examination) or (if later) the Chair of the Examiners, Honour School of Literae Humaniores.]

  • [For students starting from MT 2016: 8. Candidates wishing to change the title of their thesis after it has been approved may apply for permission to make the change to the Chair of the Standing Committee for Mods and Greats, c/o the Academic Administrative Officer (email: undergraduate@classics.ox.ac.uk) no later than 5 pm on the Friday two weeks before the submission deadline.]

  • 9. Candidates shall submit two copies of their thesis, identified by their candidate number only, not later than noon on Friday of Week 0 of the Trinity Full Term of the examination to the Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, addressed to the Chair of the Examiners, Honour School of Literae Humaniores. At the same time they shall submit a searchable electronic version to undergraduate@classics.ox.ac.uk.

N.B. For prescribed editions in all forms of the Honour School of Literae Humaniores, see the Greats Handbook.

1 University classes will be given for only one of these options each year.