Master of Studies in Ancient Philosophy

  • 1. Every candidate must follow for at least three terms a course of instruction in Ancient Philosophy. Candidates will, when they enter for the examination, be required to produce from their society a certificate that they are following such a course.

  • 2. Every candidate shall be required to offer (i) three essays in Ancient Philosophy: one on the first subject (refer to 4. below) and the other two on the second subject (refer to 5. below); and (ii) a thesis in Ancient Philosophy of 10,000-15,000 words.

  • 3. The choice of subjects must be notified on the entry form for the examination, to be submitted by Friday of fourth week of Michaelmas Term.

  • 4. The first subject shall be chosen from the list of undergraduate papers in ancient philosophy 0130-0135, as specified in the special regulations for Philosophy in all Honour Schools including Philosophy. The subject will be assessed by one 5,000 word essay on a topic (relevant to the subject) to be chosen by the candidate and approved by the Chair of Examiners no later than Friday of eighth week of Michaelmas Term. Two copies of the essay must be submitted to the Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG by 10 a.m. on the Friday of noughth week of Hilary Term in the year in which the examination is taken. Essays must be typed or printed.

  • 5. The second subject shall be a dedicated class taught across the Michaelmas and Hilary terms of the year of examination. The subject will be assessed by two 5,000 word essays on two topics (relevant to the subject) to be chosen by the candidate and approved by the Chair of Examiners no later than Friday of fifth week of Hilary Term. Two copies of each essay must be submitted to the Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG, by 10 a.m. on Friday of ninth week of Hilary Term in the year in which the examination is taken. Essays must be typed or printed.

  • 6. Candidates may not be permitted to offer certain combinations of subjects.

  • 7. The reading lists for all subjects will include texts both in the original language and in translation; candidates' readings will be guided by their supervisor(s) according to their level of Ancient Greek. All reading lists will be posted on the Faculty website in Trinity Term preceding the year of examination.

  • 8. Candidates must offer a thesis of no more than 10,000-15,000 words, exclusive of bibliographical references, on a subject proposed by the candidate in consultation with his or her supervisor and approved by the Graduate Studies Committee in Philosophy. A subject and thesis title must be submitted to the Committee no later than the fifth week of the Hilary Term of the year in which the examination is to be taken. Requests for permission to make later changes to the thesis title should be submitted, with the support of the candidate's supervisor to the Director of Graduate Studies in Philosophy as soon as the candidate has decided to seek permission. Two copies of the thesis must be submitted to the Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG, by 10 a.m. on Wednesday of eighth week of Trinity Term in the year in which the examination is taken. The thesis shall be accompanied by a brief abstract and statement of the number of words it contains (exclusive of bibliographical references). Successful candidates will be required to deposit one copy of the thesis in the Bodleian Library (candidates will also be required to sign a form stating that they give permission for the thesis to be consulted).

  • 9. Candidates who have not delivered the essays or the thesis as prescribed by the due date shall, unless they show exceptional cause, be deemed to have withdrawn from the examination.

  • 10. Each essay shall be the candidate's own work. The candidate may discuss a draft (but not more than one) of each essay with his or her supervisor. The candidate's supervisor may provide bibliographical advice on essays throughout.

  • 11. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination. A candidate who fails any one of the four elements of the examination (i.e. one of the three essays or the thesis) may apply to retake that element either in the September immediately following the examination, or in the year immediately following the failed examination, in line with the normal assessment submission timetable for the course. It is necessary for a candidate to retake only the failed elements of the examination. No resubmitted essay or thesis can receive a mark of more than 60.