Bachelor of Theology

[For students entering from 1 October 2014:

GENERAL REGULATIONS 

  • 1. The examination for the Degree of Bachelor of Theology shall be under the supervision of the Continuing Education Board, which shall have power, subject to the approval of the Education Committee, to make regulations governing the examination.

  • 2. Any person who has been admitted under the provisions of this section as a Student for the Degree of Bachelor of Theology, who has satisfied the conditions prescribed in this section, and who has satisfied the examiners for the degree, may supplicate for the Degree of Bachelor of Theology.

  • 3. No full-time student for the Degree of Bachelor of Theology shall be granted leave to supplicate unless, after admission, they have kept statutory residence and pursued their course of study at Oxford for at least nine terms. Time spent outside Oxford while registered as a student for the Undergraduate Certificate in Theological Studies or as part of an academic programme approved by the Continuing Education Board shall count towards residence for the purposes of this clause. No full-time student for the Degree of Bachelor of Theology shall retain that status for more than twelve terms in all.

  • 4. A student who takes the degree by two years of full-time study and the remainder by means of part-time study shall retain the status of Student for the Degree of Bachelor of Theology for no more than fifteen terms. A student who takes the degree by one year of full-time study and the remainder by means of part-time study shall retain that status for no more than eighteen terms. A student who takes the degree wholly part-time shall retain that status for no more than twenty-one terms.

  • 5. A student may transfer from full-time to part-time status or vice versa with the approval of the Continuing Education Board.

  • 6. Part-time students shall not be required to keep statutory residence, but must attend for such instruction at their Hall for such times as shall be required by the Continuing Education Board.

  • 7. Candidates may be permitted under certain circumstances to suspend status for a maximum of six terms.

  • 8. Candidates for this degree may be admitted by such Permanent Private Halls as have been granted permission to do so.

  • 9. The Registrar shall keep a register of all candidates so admitted.

SPECIAL REGULATIONS

A

  • 1. Candidates may be admitted either onto Part 1 or directly onto Part 2 of the course. Admission directly onto Part 2 is at the discretion of the Continuing Education Board, and candidates so admitted will normally be expected to have satisfactorily completed the Undergraduate Certificate in Theological Studies. Applications for dispensation from this requirement will be considered, in exceptional circumstances only, by the Board. To be dispensed from this requirement, candidates must demonstrate that they have undertaken equivalent study to an equivalent standard. Where candidates are admitted on the basis of having completed the Undergraduate Certificate, work done for the Certificate will be deemed to be work done for the Bachelor of Theology.

  • 2. Part 1 is available on a full time basis over three terms and on a part time basis over six terms. Part 2 is available on a wholly full time basis over six terms and on a wholly part time basis over twelve terms.

  • 3. No candidate may attempt Part 2 until they have either satisfactorily completed or have been dispensed from Part 1.

  • 4. For any candidate who is successful in the examination for the Degree of Bachelor of Theology, and who has already successfully completed the Undergraduate Certificate in Theological Studies (and for the Bachelor of Theology examination has incorporated the assignments submitted for the Undergraduate Certificate) the Degree will subsume their Certificate.

  • 5. Any candidate who has successfully completed Part 1 and who does not either proceed to, or successfully complete, Part 2, and who has not previously successfully completed the Undergraduate Certificate in Theological Studies shall be awarded the Certificate.

  • 6. In the following regulations, the English version of the Bible used will be the New Revised Standard Version with the Apocrypha (Anglicized Edition). The Greek text used will be the The Greek New Testament (United Bible Societies, 4th edn. 1993). The Hebrew text used will be the Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia (Stuttgart, 1977).

B

Part 1

  • [For students starting from MT 2017: 7. Every candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners in written assignments or examination papers, as specified, for six papers to include:

    • i. At least one of A1 or A2 from Part 1 of the Schedule;

    • ii. At least one of A3 or A4 from the Part 1 Schedule;

    • iii. At least one of A5–A10 from the Part 1 Schedule;

    • iv. Three other papers from the Part 1 Schedule.

  • The written work will be submitted via the Department for Continuing Education approved online submission system. Videos or other recordings will be submitted in an appropriate electronic format to the Examiners for the Bachelor in Theology, Rewley House, Wellington Square, Oxford. Work should be submitted for consideration by such dates as the examiners shall determine and shall notify candidates.

  • 8. Candidates who fail to satisfy the examiners in the written work or the examinations under 7. may be permitted to resubmit work in respect of part or parts of the examination which they have failed, on not more than one occasion, which shall normally be within one year of the initial failure.]

  • [For students starting before MT 2017: 7. Every candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners in the following:

    • (a) Attendance at classes and other sessions as indicated in the course handbook

    • (b) Written assignments or examination papers, as specified, for six papers to include:

      • i. At least one of A1 or A2 from Part 1 of the Schedule;

      • ii. At least one of A3 or A4 from the Part 1 Schedule;

      • iii. At least one of A5–A10 from the Part 1 Schedule;

      • iv. Three other papers from the Part 1 Schedule.

  • The written work under (b) will be submitted via the Department for Continuing Education approved online submission system. Videos or other recordings will be submitted in an appropriate electronic format to the Examiners for the Bachelor in Theology, Rewley House, Wellington Square, Oxford. Work should be submitted for consideration by such dates as the examiners shall determine and shall notify candidates.

  • 8. Candidates who fail to satisfy the examiners in the written work or the examinations under 7(b) may be permitted to resubmit work in respect of part or parts of the examination which they have failed, on not more than one occasion, which shall normally be within one year of the initial failure.]

Part 2

  • [For students starting from MT 2017: 9. Every candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners in written assignments or examination papers, as specified, for a further twelve papers (or eleven see v. below):

    • i. At least one paper from section B of the Part 2 Schedule;

    • ii. At least one paper from section C of the Part 2 Schedule;

    • iii. At least one paper from Section D of the Part 2 Schedule;

    • iv. At least one paper from Section E of the Part 2 Schedule;

    • v. Eight, or seven if paper E2 or E3 is chosen, other papers from any paper listed in i–iii above or paper A11 or A12. Candidates who offered either A11 or A12 for the Undergraduate Certificate may not offer that paper in Part 2.

  • The written work will be submitted via the Department for Continuing Education approved online submission system. Videos or other recordings will be submitted in an appropriate electronic format to the Examiners for the Bachelor in Theology, Rewley House, Wellington Square, Oxford. Work should be submitted for consideration by such dates as the examiners shall determine and shall notify candidates.

  • 10. All candidates must be assessed by written examinations in at least two modules during the course of their study.

  • 11. Candidates who fail to satisfy the examiners in the written work or the examinations under 9 may be permitted to resubmit work in respect of the paper or papers of the examination which they have failed, on not more than one occasion, which shall normally be within one year of the initial failure.

  • 12. Candidates may be expected to attend a viva voce examination at the end of the course.]

  • [For students starting before MT 2017: 9. Every candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners in the following:

    • (a) Attendance at classes and other sessions as indicated in the course handbook

    • (b) Written assignments or examination papers, as specified, for a further twelve papers (or eleven see v. below):

      • i. At least one paper from section B of the Part 2 Schedule;

      • ii. At least one paper from section C of the Part 2 Schedule;

      • iii. At least one paper from Section D of the Part 2 Schedule;

      • iv. At least one paper from Section E of the Part 2 Schedule;

      • v. Eight, or seven if paper E2 or E3 is chosen, other papers from any paper listed in i–iii above. Candidates who offered either A11 or A12 for the Undergraduate Certificate may not offer that paper in Part 2.

      • v. Eight, or seven if paper E2 or E3 is chosen, other papers from any paper listed in i–iii above or paper A11 or A12. Candidates who offered either A11 or A12 for the Undergraduate Certificate may not offer that paper in Part 2.
  • The written work under (b) will be submitted via the Department for Continuing Education approved online submission system. Videos or other recordings will be submitted in an appropriate electronic format to the Examiners for the Bachelor in Theology, Rewley House, Wellington Square, Oxford. Work should be submitted for consideration by such dates as the examiners shall determine and shall notify candidates.

  • 10. All candidates must be assessed by written examinations in at least two modules during the course of their study.

  • 11. Candidates who fail to satisfy the examiners in the written work or the examinations under 9(b) may be permitted to resubmit work in respect of part or parts of the examination which they have failed, on not more than one occasion, which shall normally be within one year of the initial failure.

  • 12. Candidates may be expected to attend a viva voce examination at the end of the course.]

Schedule of Papers

[Note: Not all options may be available in any one year]

Part One:

Section A: Introductory papers

A1 Introduction to the Old Testament

A2 Introduction to the New Testament

A3 The History of the Church

A4 Introduction to Christian Doctrine

A5 Contemporary Mission and Culture

A6 Introduction to Spirituality

A7 Introduction to Ministry and Worship

A8 Introduction to the Study of Religion

A9 Introduction to Christian Faith and Philosophy

A10 Introduction to Christian Faith and Science

A11 Elementary Biblical Hebrew

A12 Elementary Biblical Greek

Part Two:

Section B: Biblical Studies

B1 Further Studies in the Old Testament

B2 Further Studies in the New Testament

B3 Biblical Interpretation

B4 An Old Testament Book

B5 A New Testament Book

B6 Advanced New Testament Hebrew

B7 Advanced New Testament Greek

Section C: History and Doctrine

C1 Issues in Church History

C2 Issues in Christian Doctrine

C3 Ecclesiology

C4 Theologies of Salvation

C5 A Special Theologian

Section D: Practical Theology and Religious Studies

D1 Issues in Christian Ministry

D2 The Person and Role of an Ordained Minister

D3 Christian Ethics

D4 Issues in Mission

D5 Issues in Christian Worship

D6 Issues in Christian Spirituality

D7 World Religions

D8 Philosophical Theology

D9 Issues in Christian Faith and Science

Section E: Independent Study

[For students starting before MT 2016: E1 Theological Reflection ]

E2 Dissertation (counts as 2 papers)

E3 Project (counts as 2 papers) ]


[For students starting before 1 October 2014:

  • 1. The examination for the Degree of Bachelor of Theology shall be under the supervision of the Board of the Faculty of Theology and Religion which shall have power to make regulations governing the examination.

  • 2. Any person who has been admitted under the provisions of this section as a Student for the Degree of Bachelor of Theology, who has satisfied the conditions prescribed in this section, and who has satisfied the examiners for the degree may supplicate for the Degree of Bachelor of Theology.

  • 3. No full-time student for the Degree of Bachelor of Theology shall be granted leave to supplicate unless, after admission, he or she has kept statutory residence and pursued his or her course of study at Oxford for at least nine terms. Time spent outside Oxford as part of an academic programme approved by the faculty board shall count towards residence for the purposes of this clause.

  • 4. No full-time student for the Degree of Bachelor of Theology shall retain that status for more than twelve terms in all.

  • 5. Part-time students for the Degree of Bachelor of Theology shall in each case be required to pursue their course of study for twice the number of terms required of an equivalent full-time student. A student who takes the degree by two years full-time and the rest part-time shall retain the status of Student for the Degree of Bachelor of Theology for no more than fifteen terms. A student who takes the degree by one year full-time and the rest part-time shall retain that status for no more than eighteen terms. A student who takes the degree wholly part-time shall retain that status for no more than twenty-one terms. A student may transfer from full-time to part-time status or vice-versa with the approval of the B.Th. Supervisory Committee.

  • 6. Part-time students shall not be required to keep statutory residence, but must attend for such instruction at their college for such times during full term as shall be required by the faculty board concerned, and must also attend at least one week's residential course each year, the total hours of attendance in each year of the course being as prescribed by the faculty board concerned.

  • 7. Students for the Degree of Bachelor of Theology may transfer to the Certificate in Theology with the approval of the B.Th. Supervisory Committee.

  • 8. The B.Th. Supervisory Committee will supervise arrangements for the Bachelor of Theology, the Certificate in Theology and the Certificate for Theology Graduates. This committee will elect its Chair, Secretary, and Treasurer. The Chair and Secretary will form a Standing Committee together with the Chair of Examiners for these courses. In addition to these officers, the committee will consist of two representatives of the Board of the Faculty of Theology and one representative of each of the participating institutions. The committee will have such powers and duties as may from time to time be prescribed by the Board of the Faculty of Theology and Religion.

  • 9. Candidates for this degree may be admitted by Blackfriars; Campion Hall; Harris Manchester College; Mansfield College; Regent's Park College; Ripon College, Cuddesdon; St Benet's Hall; St Stephen's House; and Wycliffe Hall.

  • 10. The Registrar shall keep a register of all candidates so admitted.

A. REGULATIONS FOR THE COURSE OF INSTRUCTION AT BLACKFRIARS; CAMPION HALL; HARRIS MANCHESTER COLLEGE; MANSFIELD COLLEGE; REGENT'S PARK COLLEGE; RIPON COLLEGE, CUDDESDON; ST BENET'S HALL; ST STEPHEN'S HOUSE; AND WYCLIFFE HALL.

  • A.1 Course requirements

    Candidates must take at least twelve papers. In Part 1 candidates must take all four papers. In Part 2 they must take at least: one paper from section B; either C1 or C4; and one paper from section D. Candidates, including those who take E9 twice, may take a maximum of four papers from section E. Only one paper may be taken from section F. The B.Th. Supervisory Committee may dispense a candidate from individual compulsory papers on the basis of previous academic work, but not from the total number of papers required.

    Details of which subjects may or must be taken by two short essays or one long essay in place of written examination papers are given in the syllabus in section B below.

  • A.2 Examinations

    Candidates will be examined at the end of each academic year of their course of study. Examination will be held in April or May, beginning on the Monday of the second week of Trinity Term, and in September or October, at the end of the second week before Michaelmas Full Term.

    Every candidate shall complete an entry form, showing the subject he or she intends to take in that year, by noon on Friday of the second week of Hilary Term for the May examination, and by noon on Friday of the seventh week of Trinity Term for the Autumn examination.

    The examiners may examine the candidate viva voce, no candidate who has passed in a subject may sit that examination again.

    A candidate who has failed in more than two subjects in an examination shall be deemed to have failed in all the subjects offered at that examination. A candidate may offer at a subsequent examination a subject or subjects in which he or she has failed. Normally only one resit will be allowed in each subject, provided that the B.Th. Supervisory Committee shall have power in exceptional circumstances and on submission of a case by a candidate's college to approve a second resit.

  • A.3 Long Essays

    Approval for the subjects proposed for long essays must be obtained from the B.Th. Supervisory Committee by completing a Long Essay Title Form and submitting it to the Supervisory Committee by noon on the Friday of: Week Four of Michaelmas Term, Week Four of Hilary Term, or Week Six of Trinity Term.

    A proposed title must cover a theme within the rubric of the paper. Candidates are advised to seek approval for titles as early as practicable in advance of the examination. After the Long Essay Title Form is returned with dated approval, it must be retained for submission with the completed work.

    Long essays must be entirely the candidate’s own work. Candidates may receive tutorial guidance in the early stages of composition, and tutors may read and comment on a first draft.

    Candidates must submit two copies of each essay (marked A and B), which must be printed on a single side of paper. Each copy must have a standard title sheet, indicating essay title and candidate number (but not name or college) and word count (including footnotes but not bibliography). Candidates must also submit the approved Long Essay Title Form, with its final section now completed to confirm that the essay is entirely the candidate’s own work and that a course of instruction covering the syllabus has been satisfactorily completed. These documents must be placed together in a sealed envelope, marked with the number and title of the paper and the candidate’s examination number and addressed to the Chair of Examiners, Bachelor of Theology, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG. Long essays must be submitted by noon on the first Monday of Trinity Full Term for the Trinity Term examination, or the second Monday before Michaelmas Full Term for the Long Vacation examination.

    Note. All communications for the Supervisory Committee for the Degree of Bachelor of Theology should be addressed to the Secretary of the B.Th. Supervisory Committee, whose address may be obtained from each college's B.Th. course director or from the Theology and Religion Faculty Centre, Gibson Building, ROQ, Oxford OX2 6GG.

B. THE SYLLABUS

† assessed by three-hour written examination

‡ assessed in Part I by two essays of 2,500 words (± 10%), whose titles are to be drawn from a list agreed by tutors and approved by the Supervisory Committee; and in Part II by a long essay of 5,000 words (± 10%), the title of which must be submitted to the Supervisory Committee for approval. Candidates must sign a declaration supported by their society that they have attended an appropriate course of instruction and have adequately covered the syllabus of the paper or, where specified, of the option(s) selected.

§ assessed by other means, as noted in the rubric.

Note that most papers may be examined by more than one means.

Full-time candidates must attempt all Part 1 papers in their first year. They may attempt Part 2 papers at any examination session following the first Trinity Term. Part-time candidates must attempt all Part 1 papers in their first two years. They may attempt Part 2 papers at any examination session after their first year, provided they have completed Part 1 or are completing it in the same session. Any candidate who withdraws from a Part I paper must also withdraw from all Part II papers entered in the same session.

Part 1 papers will be assessed at first year level, and will be given reduced weighting in considering a candidate's degree classification or certificate award.

In all written examinations candidates will be provided with a copy of the New Revised Standard Version with the Apocrypha (Anglicized Edition), except when they are answering questions on Hebrew or Greek texts. Those who wish to answer questions on Hebrew or Greek texts must specify this on their entry forms. The texts used in these cases will be: The Greek New Testament (United Bible Societies, 4th edn. 1993); Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia (Stuttgart, 1977).

PART 1

This part addresses fundamental issues of Biblical Study, Christian Thought, and Christian Ministry, laying a foundation for further study.

SECTION A. FOUNDATION STUDIES

  • †A.1 — Old Testament A

    Candidates will study the Pentateuch and the Prophetic Books, with particular reference to Genesis, Deuteronomy and Isaiah. They will study specific texts: either Genesis 1-3, 15-17, Deuteronomy 5-7, 12, 15-16 and Isaiah 5-11, 49-53 in English; or Genesis 1-4 or Jonah in Hebrew. Candidates who wish to prepare for assessment in Hebrew must enter for the written examination with texts in Hebrew. However, in the examination itself they may transfer to texts in English without penalty.

  • † A.2 — New Testament A

    Candidates will study Matthew and 1 Corinthians, and may also study Mark, addressing such issues as methodology in New Testament study, the person and ministry of Jesus, the context and theology of the authors, and ecclesiological issues. They will also study in detail either Matthew 9-10, 26-8 (with the option of Markan parallels) and 1 Corinthians 7-11 in English, or Matthew 9-10 in Greek, or 1 Corinthians 7-8 in Greek. Candidates who wish to prepare for assessment in Greek must enter for the written examination with texts in Greek. However, in the examination itself they may transfer to texts in English without penalty.

  • ‡ A.3 — Christian Life and Thought

    Foundation studies in this discipline can take different routes:

    • Either ‡ A.3.A — Foundations of Christian Thought

      Candidates will study some of the foundational issues involved in the study of Christian theology including faith, revelation, Scripture, authority, tradition, development, religious language, and the relationship of Christian theology to other disciplines.

    • Or ‡ A.3.B — Development of Christian Life and Thought

      Candidates will study the development of Christian life and thought in its cultural and historical context, including issues of authority, spirituality and ministry within Christian communities; and sources and forms of theological reflection and conflict. They should demonstrate some awareness of primary sources (in translation).

    • Candidates will study the following foundational period:

      • (a) First to fifth centuries.

    • They may also study one of the following periods:

      • (b) Sixth to eleventh centuries;

      • (c) Eleventh to fourteenth centuries;

      • (d) Fifteenth and sixteenth centuries.

    • Candidates must specify the periods within which the subjects of their essays fall on their examination entrance forms; they cannot subsequently be assessed on these periods in Paper C.2.

  • ‡ A.4 — Christian Witness and the Contemporary World

    Candidates will study the relationship between Christian faith and contemporary culture, including religious and secular understandings of society, environment, personhood, and faith. Candidates will be expected to reflect on the practice of mission.

PART 2

SECTION B. BIBLICAL STUDIES

  • †‡ B.1 — Old Testament B

  • Candidates will study the Historical Books (Joshua, Judges, 1 and 2 Samuel, 1 and 2 Kings, 1 and 2 Chronicles, Ezra, Nehemiah) and the other Writings (Psalms, Proverbs, Job, Ecclesiastes, Song of Songs, Lamentations, Ruth, Esther, Daniel).

  • They will also study at least one of the following set texts:

    • (i) 2 Samuel 1-12 or 2 Kings 17-25 in English;

    • (ii) Psalms 42-49, 84-89 or Job 1–5, 38–42 in English;

    • (iii) 2 Kings 21-23 in Hebrew;

    • (iv) Ruth in Hebrew.

  • Candidates who wish to prepare for assessment in Hebrew must enter for the written examination with texts in Hebrew. However, in the examination itself they may transfer to texts in English without penalty.

  • †‡ B.2 — New Testament B

    Candidates will study issues of New Testament theology, ethics and interpretation, and at least two of the following books: John, Romans, Hebrews. They may also study the Pastoral Epistles and Revelation. They will study in detail texts from John 1-6, 9-12, 17-20, Romans 1-12, and Hebrews in English; and they may study John 1-3, 6, 17 and/or Romans 5-8 in Greek. Candidates being assessed by long essay may write on any New Testament text (except those texts listed in the rubric for paper A.2), so long as they have adequately covered the syllabus of the paper (For those candidates admitted on or after 1 October 2012) in their course of instruction. Candidates who wish to prepare for assessment in Greek must enter for the written examination with texts in Greek. However, in the examination itself they may transfer to texts in English without penalty.

  • †‡ B.3 — Biblical Interpretation

    Candidates will study Part A or Part B or both.

    Part A: Candidates will study: central themes in both testaments such as God, creation, the people of God, redemption, messiah, community, worship, hope; and the methodological issues of constructing biblical theology.

    Part B: Candidates will study the history and practice of biblical interpretation, including major contemporary trends.

SECTION C. DOCTRINE AND HISTORY

  • †‡ C.1 — Christian Doctrine

    Candidates will study the central doctrines of the Christian church, as set out in the historic creeds and formulae, including critical reflection on traditional and recent expositions of these doctrines and engagement with contemporary theological discussion.

  • †‡ C.2 — Church History

    Candidates will study the development of Christian life and thought in its cultural and historical context, including issues of authority, spirituality, and ministry within Christian communities; and sources and forms of theological reflection and conflict. They should demonstrate some awareness of primary sources (in translation).

  • Candidates must specify one period for assessment by written exam or long essay, which must not be one on which they were assessed in Paper A.3.B:

    • (a) First to fifth centuries;

    • (b) Sixth to eleventh centuries;

    • (c) Eleventh to fourteenth centuries;

    • (d) Fifteenth and sixteenth centuries;

    • (e) Seventeenth and eighteenth centuries;

    • (f) Nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

  • †‡ C.3 — Ecclesiology

    Candidates will study the theology of the church, including ministry and the sacraments, in its historical development and contemporary practice.

  • †‡ C.4 — Study of Theology

    (Candidates who have taken A.3.A may not take this paper.)

    Candidates will study some of the major issues involved in the study of Christian theology, including faith, revelation, reason, Scripture, authority, tradition, development, religious language, and the relationship of Christian thought to other disciplines and other religions.

SECTION D. PRACTICAL THEOLOGY

  • § D.1 — Mission and Ministry

    This paper will be assessed by an essay of 5,000 words (± 10%), which must be based on a supervised placement of at least twenty-one days in a church or secular setting in which the candidate shares in the experiences of those involved, and must be accompanied by a declaration supported by the student’s society that the placement has been undertaken. The essay may be accompanied by additional documentation on the nature of the placement that would not otherwise be available to the examiner, which must not exceed ten A4 pages in total and must not identify the candidate. The essay should contain theological reflection on the placement with the help of the candidate’s study of issues of mission and ministry and, as appropriate, of contributory disciplines.

  • § D.2 — Christian Ethics

    This paper consists of two parts, (a) and (b):

    • (a) Ethics and Faith (three hour examination or long essay)

      Candidates will study the foundations of Christian moral thought and practice; contemporary moral and social problems; and the relation of Christian moral life to faith, witness, and worship. This part of the paper will be assessed either by a long essay of 4,000 words (± 10%), the title of which must be submitted for approval to the Supervisory Committee, or by a three-hour written examination.

    • (b) Ethics and Ministry (two hour examination)

      This part of the paper will be assessed by a two-hour written examination. Candidates should demonstrate ethical and pastoral competence in analysis of, reflection on, and response to a particular situation. This will be a situation relating to sexuality, marriage, and the family, unless the Supervisory Committee gives notice otherwise.

  • †‡ D.3 — Christian Worship

    Candidates will study the history and theology of Christian initiation, the Eucharist, the daily worship; the place of prayer in worship; non-verbal aspects of liturgy and their cultural factors; relevant insights from the human sciences; word and sacrament, liturgical symbolism, and the place of preaching; worship and the Church's mission; other forms of corporate worship.

  • †‡ D.4 — Christian Spirituality

    Candidates will study the history and theology of Christian spirituality including major traditions and figures; and the relationship of spirituality to: scripture, liturgy, hymnody, doctrine, and current trends.

SECTION E. OTHER SUBJECTS

  • †‡ E.1 — Christian Mission

    Candidates will study the following: the biblical and theological foundations of mission; the relationship of the Church to the missio Dei ; factors in the contemporary world affecting mission, such as industrialisation, urbanisation, secularism, pluralism, and new forms of imperialism. These subjects may be focused through the study of: the history of Christian mission; the distinction between mission and evangelism; the encounter with other faiths; issues of contextualisation; apologetics; liberation movements; and the work of significant missiologists.

  • †‡ E.2 — Christian Faith and Other Religions

    Candidates will study methodology in the study of religion; Christian approaches to other religions; and one religion other than Christianity, chosen from (and to be specified on the entry form): Hinduism, Buddhism, post-Biblical Judaism, Islam, or a religion proposed by the candidate and approved by the Supervisory Committee.

  • †‡ E.3 — Christian Faith and Philosophy

    Candidates will study the relationship between Christianity and the Western philosophical tradition. They will also study relevant issues including: the relation between reason and revelation; the existence of God; the problem of evil; non-objective theism; religious language; religious experience; resurrection and the immortality of the soul.

  • †‡ E.4 — Christian Faith and Science

    Candidates will study the relationship between Christian theology and the development of modern science, including: methodology and epistemology in science and theology; the origin of the universe and humanity; the quantum world; the biosphere and ecosystems; and ethical issues of scientific research and development.

  • †‡ E.5 — Christian Faith and Social Sciences

    Candidates will study the relationship between Christian theology and the social sciences, including such areas as methodology in both disciplines; sociological and anthropological interpretations of religion; theological and sociological understandings of social phenomena; sociological understandings of religious organisation; and theological critiques of social sciences.

  • †‡ E.6 — Christian Faith and Psychology

    Candidates will study the contribution of psychological theory to pastoral theology and pastoral care, in areas such as: developmental theory and the life cycle; human sexuality; love and attachment; and mental health. They will also study: major psychological theories and their critique of religious systems; the counselling movement; the role of the pastor; the nature of pastoral ministry in relation to birth, marriage, and death.

  • †‡ E.7 — Canon Law

    Candidates will study the sources, history, and theology of Western canon law or the Eastern canonical tradition or both (to be specified on the entry form); and current systems of canons, e.g. the Roman Catholic Code of Canon Law and the Canons of the Church of England, including an introduction to comparative issues.

  • ‡ E.8 — Confessional Study

    Candidates will study the tradition of a Christian denomination as expressed in its formularies, liturgy, spirituality, and ethics.

  • † E.9 —Translation Paper

  • Candidates may propose texts for approval by the Supervisory Committee, from which passages will be set for translation and comment in a three-hour written examination. The texts must be in a language relevant to theological study, such as Biblical Hebrew, New Testament Greek or Ecclesiastical Latin.

    A candidate may offer Paper E.9 twice, so as to be examined on texts in two different languages.

SECTION F. DISSERTATION OR PROJECT

Candidates may either write a dissertation or undertake a project capable of suitable assessment. In either case, it is expected that no college-assessed formative pieces of work will be required.

  • § F.1 — Dissertation

    Candidates may propose a topic for approval by the Supervisory Committee, a topic which will involve some research and/or interdisciplinary study leading to the composition of a dissertation of 10,000 words (± 10%).

    The proposal should include the title, a brief description of the subject and approach envisaged, and a preliminary bibliography.

  • § F.2 — Project

    Candidates may propose a project for approval by the Supervisory Committee.

    The proposal should include the title, a brief description of the subject and approach envisaged, a preliminary bibliography and details of the proposed assessment method.]