Gender pay gap reporting

The gender pay gap is a measure of the difference between men’s and women’s average earnings across the University. As an employer with more than 250 employees it is a legal requirement for the University to publish statutory calculations on its pay gap every year.

As an employer with more than 250 employees it is a legal requirement for the University to report its gender pay gap based on the “snapshot date” of 31 March each year.  The University has 12 months from the snapshot date in which to publish the pay information.

The regulations stipulate that the following information must be reported:

  • mean gender pay gap in hourly pay
  • median gender pay gap in hourly pay
  • mean bonus gender pay gap
  • median bonus gender pay gap
  • proportion of males and females receiving a bonus payment
  • proportion of males and females in each pay quartile

In accordance with the regulations and with reference to the Equality Act 2010 the University’s gender pay gap report includes data relating to persons who are engaged by the legal entity incorporated under the name ‘The Chancellors Masters and Scholars of the University of Oxford’ (“the University”).  This includes employees in University of Oxford departments, casual workers (including those undertaking casual teaching), those engaged through the University’s Temporary Staffing Service and those who work within Oxford University Press (“OUP”).

The University reporting does not include colleges or subsidiary companies, which are separate legal entities.

The University is committed to closing its gender pay gap and is undertaking a number of actions in relation to this. The latest gender pay gap report and narrative can be found here.

Gender Pay Gap Reporting: Frequently Asked Questions

When did the Regulations covering gender pay gap reporting come into force?

The Regulations came into force on 31 March 2017. Public sector employers have 12 months from 31 March 2017 to publish the data.

What do we have to report?

The gender pay gap is a measure of the difference between men’s and women’s average earnings across the University.

The figures to be reported are as follows:

  • Median and mean gross hourly pay gap
  • Median and mean bonus pay gaps
  • Percentage of female and percentage of male relevant employees who received bonus pay
  • Percentage of female and percentage of male relevant employees in each pay quartile

What is the definition of mean and median pay?

The "Mean" hourly rate is calculated by adding all of the hourly rates together and dividing by the number of individuals in the data set.

The median hourly rate is calculated by arranging the hourly rates of all individuals in the data set in numerical order to identify the middle (or median) hourly rate. 50% of individuals will earn more than this hourly rate and 50% will earn less.

What is a pay gap?

The gender pay gap is a measure of the difference between men’s and women’s mean and median earnings  across the University and is represented as a percentage.

How does the data need to be published?

The data must be published on the University’s website and be publically available. The data also needs to be published on the government’s online reporting service.

How frequently is the University required to publish its gender pay gap?

The University is legally required to publish its gender pay gap as specified in the regulations on an annual basis by the 30 March each year and based on the snapshot date of 31 March the previous year. 

What is the difference between gender pay gaps and equal pay?

The gender pay gap is a measure of the difference between mens and womens average earnings across the University. Equal pay ensures we are paying the same level of pay to those who are performing the same work, or work assessed as being of equal value as determined by an analytical job evaluation scheme which looks at the skills and requirements of the job. It is possible therefore to have a gender pay gap without having any equal pay gaps.